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Conference Paper: Addressing the health consequences of intimate partner violence: Lessons from health research

TitleAddressing the health consequences of intimate partner violence: Lessons from health research
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
The 2007 Health Reserach Symposium, Hong Kong, 29 September 2007. How to Cite?
AbstractViolence against women by an intimate partner (intimate partner violence, IPV) is an important public health problem with costs to the individuals and society. There is mounting evidence that IPV has physical, psychological and sexual health consequences for survivors. The consequences may be short-term and direct, such as the common face, head and neck injuries. Some of the injuries can be fatal. The long-term consequences may range from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, central nervous system symptoms (e.g. headaches, fainting or seizures), gastrointestinal disorders (e.g. chronic irritable bowel syndrome), cardiac problems (e.g. hypertension or angina), immune system dysfunction (e.g. colds or flu) to gynaecological problems (e.g. sexually transmitted infections, vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain or urinary tract infection). The negative health effects may persist long after the abuse has ended. The IPV - health relationship is complex and further studies are needed to better explain the process by which IPV is related to specific health problems, health behaviours and the worsening of health among such a vulnerable population. Health research adopting a multi-dimensional approach to address the health consequences of IPV has provided better understanding of the needs of abused women. For example, using conceptualisations of health based on the principles of Chinese Medicine, researchers in a local study have succeeded to help abused women to understand their health problems and initiate dietary practices based on Chinese dietetics with good effect. Furthermore, the same researchers have found that an intervention incorporating dietary, parenting and empowerment training may reduce the harm of IPV on women's health provided the confounding factors are addressed also. In charting future directions in IPV research, researchers need to work together with clinicians, shelter workers, advocates, mental health workers and abused women to develop a research agenda that is multidisciplinary and addresses IPV across the life span.
DescriptionTheme: Building Bridges Between Research, Practice & Policy
Session - Impact of health research I: no. S6
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/116312

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, AFYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2007 Health Reserach Symposium, Hong Kong, 29 September 2007.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/116312-
dc.descriptionTheme: Building Bridges Between Research, Practice & Policy-
dc.descriptionSession - Impact of health research I: no. S6-
dc.description.abstractViolence against women by an intimate partner (intimate partner violence, IPV) is an important public health problem with costs to the individuals and society. There is mounting evidence that IPV has physical, psychological and sexual health consequences for survivors. The consequences may be short-term and direct, such as the common face, head and neck injuries. Some of the injuries can be fatal. The long-term consequences may range from depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain, central nervous system symptoms (e.g. headaches, fainting or seizures), gastrointestinal disorders (e.g. chronic irritable bowel syndrome), cardiac problems (e.g. hypertension or angina), immune system dysfunction (e.g. colds or flu) to gynaecological problems (e.g. sexually transmitted infections, vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain or urinary tract infection). The negative health effects may persist long after the abuse has ended. The IPV - health relationship is complex and further studies are needed to better explain the process by which IPV is related to specific health problems, health behaviours and the worsening of health among such a vulnerable population. Health research adopting a multi-dimensional approach to address the health consequences of IPV has provided better understanding of the needs of abused women. For example, using conceptualisations of health based on the principles of Chinese Medicine, researchers in a local study have succeeded to help abused women to understand their health problems and initiate dietary practices based on Chinese dietetics with good effect. Furthermore, the same researchers have found that an intervention incorporating dietary, parenting and empowerment training may reduce the harm of IPV on women's health provided the confounding factors are addressed also. In charting future directions in IPV research, researchers need to work together with clinicians, shelter workers, advocates, mental health workers and abused women to develop a research agenda that is multidisciplinary and addresses IPV across the life span.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHealth Reserach Symposium 2007en_HK
dc.titleAddressing the health consequences of intimate partner violence: Lessons from health researchen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTiwari, AFY: afytiwar@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTiwari, AFY=rp00441en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros140760en_HK

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