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Conference Paper: Loading a movement makes it easier to predict: An experimental test of the relationship between display kinematics, anticipation, and expertise

TitleLoading a movement makes it easier to predict: An experimental test of the relationship between display kinematics, anticipation, and expertise
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherHuman Kinetics
Citation
The Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, San Diego, CA, June 2007. In Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2007, v. 29 n. S, p. S17 How to Cite?
AbstractA number of empirical studies of perceptual skill in sport have observed a close link between expert anticipation and the kinematics of the action being viewed and predicted. However, few, if any, have tested this relationship directly. In this study we directly manipulated natural movement kinematics and searched for predictable changes in the time course of information pickup from these manipulated displays. Skilled and novice badminton players (15 per group) were required to predict either the direction or force of strokes hit by an intermediate player on the basis of point-light displays showing only the opponent's movement kinematics. Displays were occluded at one of six different times during the hitting action to help determine the time course of predictive information pickup. The biomechanics of the hitting action shown in the point-light displays were manipulated through loading the forearm of the intermediate player with a 1.82-kg mass, and the resultant kinematic changes were recorded and analyzed using a Peak Motus Motion Analysis system. Comparison was drawn between the advance pickup of information by the two skill groups under the loaded and unloaded conditions. It was found that loading the movement increased its predictability for both skill groups and to the extent that novice prediction of the loaded movement equaled the skilled players' prediction of the unloaded movement. The facilitatory effect of loading on the advance prediction of movement will be considered in relation to the common coding theory of perception and action (Prinz, European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 1997) and the constraints-attunement hypothesis of expertise (Vicente & Wang, Psychological Review, 1998). Possible practical implications of the findings with respect to the optimal stimulus speed for perceptual learning will also be discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/115071
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.379
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.237

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAbernethy, ABen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRaynor, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHoy, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorJackson, RCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T05:29:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T05:29:01Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Annual Conference of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, San Diego, CA, June 2007. In Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2007, v. 29 n. S, p. S17en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0895-2779-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/115071-
dc.description.abstractA number of empirical studies of perceptual skill in sport have observed a close link between expert anticipation and the kinematics of the action being viewed and predicted. However, few, if any, have tested this relationship directly. In this study we directly manipulated natural movement kinematics and searched for predictable changes in the time course of information pickup from these manipulated displays. Skilled and novice badminton players (15 per group) were required to predict either the direction or force of strokes hit by an intermediate player on the basis of point-light displays showing only the opponent's movement kinematics. Displays were occluded at one of six different times during the hitting action to help determine the time course of predictive information pickup. The biomechanics of the hitting action shown in the point-light displays were manipulated through loading the forearm of the intermediate player with a 1.82-kg mass, and the resultant kinematic changes were recorded and analyzed using a Peak Motus Motion Analysis system. Comparison was drawn between the advance pickup of information by the two skill groups under the loaded and unloaded conditions. It was found that loading the movement increased its predictability for both skill groups and to the extent that novice prediction of the loaded movement equaled the skilled players' prediction of the unloaded movement. The facilitatory effect of loading on the advance prediction of movement will be considered in relation to the common coding theory of perception and action (Prinz, European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 1997) and the constraints-attunement hypothesis of expertise (Vicente & Wang, Psychological Review, 1998). Possible practical implications of the findings with respect to the optimal stimulus speed for perceptual learning will also be discussed.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHuman Kinetics-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Sport & Exercise Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleLoading a movement makes it easier to predict: An experimental test of the relationship between display kinematics, anticipation, and expertiseen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAbernethy, AB: bruceab@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJackson, RC: robjacks@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAbernethy, AB=rp00886en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros137887en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros129175-
dc.identifier.volume29en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSuppl.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage17en_HK

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