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Conference Paper: Appetite suppressing effect of t10, c12 conjugated linoleic acid on mice is dependent on dietary fat level and the temporal pattern of energy intake is associated with changes in hypothalamic expression of genes involved in appetite control

TitleAppetite suppressing effect of t10, c12 conjugated linoleic acid on mice is dependent on dietary fat level and the temporal pattern of energy intake is associated with changes in hypothalamic expression of genes involved in appetite control
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Citation
Experimental Biology 2007, Washington, DC, 28 April–5 May 2007. In The FASEB Journal, 2007, v. 21 n. 5, p. A461 How to Cite?
AbstractIn literature, administration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to rodents caused either no change or suppression in food intake. Objectives of the present study were to monitor the temporal change in energy intake (EI) and body weight (BW) of ICR mice habitually fed on low fat (5%, LF) or high fat (30%, HF) diet then given trans10, cis12-CLA (0.5%, purity: 98%+) supplementation. mRNA expressions of hypothalamic appetite control markers were traced. Initial appetite suppression was noticed that gradually waned. Compared to unsupplemented control, CLA supplementation caused a 22.5% decrease in EI of the LF mice in the first two weeks (P < 0.05). However, CLA only caused a 4.8% drop (P = 0.306, ns) in EI of the HF mice. Accordingly, BW reduction of the LF+CLA and HF+CLA mice was 2.4 g and 0.5 g, respectively. Hypothalamic expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) was increased by CLA supplementation (P< 0.05, 2-way ANOVA). In the next two weeks, CLA had no effect on EI and BW gain, indicating a rebound in appetite of the LF+CLA mice. Hypothalamic expression of POMC was reduced whereas that of neuropeptide Y (NPY) was increased. The data indicated that CLA caused transient appetite suppression in LF mice but HF mice were relatively resistant to this effect. The temporal change in EI coincides with the shifts in the hypothalamic expressions of POMC and NPY. (Supported by HKU-CRCG).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/114879
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.775

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSo, HHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, LYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, ETSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T05:20:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T05:20:04Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Biology 2007, Washington, DC, 28 April–5 May 2007. In The FASEB Journal, 2007, v. 21 n. 5, p. A461-
dc.identifier.issn0892-6638-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/114879-
dc.description.abstractIn literature, administration of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to rodents caused either no change or suppression in food intake. Objectives of the present study were to monitor the temporal change in energy intake (EI) and body weight (BW) of ICR mice habitually fed on low fat (5%, LF) or high fat (30%, HF) diet then given trans10, cis12-CLA (0.5%, purity: 98%+) supplementation. mRNA expressions of hypothalamic appetite control markers were traced. Initial appetite suppression was noticed that gradually waned. Compared to unsupplemented control, CLA supplementation caused a 22.5% decrease in EI of the LF mice in the first two weeks (P < 0.05). However, CLA only caused a 4.8% drop (P = 0.306, ns) in EI of the HF mice. Accordingly, BW reduction of the LF+CLA and HF+CLA mice was 2.4 g and 0.5 g, respectively. Hypothalamic expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) was increased by CLA supplementation (P< 0.05, 2-way ANOVA). In the next two weeks, CLA had no effect on EI and BW gain, indicating a rebound in appetite of the LF+CLA mice. Hypothalamic expression of POMC was reduced whereas that of neuropeptide Y (NPY) was increased. The data indicated that CLA caused transient appetite suppression in LF mice but HF mice were relatively resistant to this effect. The temporal change in EI coincides with the shifts in the hypothalamic expressions of POMC and NPY. (Supported by HKU-CRCG).-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology-
dc.relation.ispartofThe FASEB Journalen_HK
dc.titleAppetite suppressing effect of t10, c12 conjugated linoleic acid on mice is dependent on dietary fat level and the temporal pattern of energy intake is associated with changes in hypothalamic expression of genes involved in appetite controlen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, MY: mytsea@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, ETS: etsli@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, ETS=rp00737en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros150489en_HK

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