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Conference Paper: Mining Communities of Bloggers: A Case Study on Cyber-hate

TitleMining Communities of Bloggers: A Case Study on Cyber-hate
Authors
Keywordsmining
data mining
network topology
data and knowledge visualization
security
Issue Date2006
Citation
The International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS 2006), Milwaukee, WI, 2006 How to Cite?
AbstractBlogs, or Weblogs, have become increasingly popular in recent years. Research has found that racists and hate groups exist in communities of bloggers. As these communities allow hate groups to spread their ideologies and even advocate hate crimes, it is important to study the structure and behavior of these communities. In this study, we analyzed the blogs of 28 anti-black hate groups on Xanga, a popular blog hosting site, using a semi-automated framework that includes blog spidering, information extraction, network analysis, and visualization. Our findings suggested that bloggers formed communities through subscription, comment, and group co-membership relationships. Subscription and commenting relationships facilitated the communication between bloggers and could help spread information, propagandas, and ideologies faster. In addition, we compared our findings with previous studies and found some interesting similarities and differences. Overall, we believe our research on online hate groups in the blogosphere is timely and important to the security of our society, and several future research directions are suggested in the paper.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/112241

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, MCLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T03:23:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T03:23:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS 2006), Milwaukee, WI, 2006-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/112241-
dc.description.abstractBlogs, or Weblogs, have become increasingly popular in recent years. Research has found that racists and hate groups exist in communities of bloggers. As these communities allow hate groups to spread their ideologies and even advocate hate crimes, it is important to study the structure and behavior of these communities. In this study, we analyzed the blogs of 28 anti-black hate groups on Xanga, a popular blog hosting site, using a semi-automated framework that includes blog spidering, information extraction, network analysis, and visualization. Our findings suggested that bloggers formed communities through subscription, comment, and group co-membership relationships. Subscription and commenting relationships facilitated the communication between bloggers and could help spread information, propagandas, and ideologies faster. In addition, we compared our findings with previous studies and found some interesting similarities and differences. Overall, we believe our research on online hate groups in the blogosphere is timely and important to the security of our society, and several future research directions are suggested in the paper.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofICIS 2006 Proceedingsen_HK
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectmining-
dc.subjectdata mining-
dc.subjectnetwork topology-
dc.subjectdata and knowledge visualization-
dc.subjectsecurity-
dc.titleMining Communities of Bloggers: A Case Study on Cyber-hateen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChau, MCL: mchau@business.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChau, MCL=rp01051en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80051571630-
dc.identifier.hkuros137584en_HK

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