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Conference Paper: Supervisor-subordinate agreement in perception of leader-member exchange quality: a beautiful misunderstanding

TitleSupervisor-subordinate agreement in perception of leader-member exchange quality: a beautiful misunderstanding
Other TitlesSupervisor-subordinate agreement in perception of LMX quality: a beautiful misunderstanding
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Citation
The 6th Australian Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference, Gold Coast, QLD., Australia, 30 June-3 July 2005. In Australian Journal of Psychology, 2005, v. 57 n. S1. p. 150-151 How to Cite?
AbstractBuilding on role theory, this paper examines the differences between supervisors and subordinates in their perception of their leader-member exchange relationships. More specifically, we hypothesise that (1) supervisors’ assessment of the dyadic relationships would be more favourable than the subordinates’ assessment of the same, and (2) this pattern will be more obvious in a collectivistic and high power distance society than in an individualistic and low power distance society. We test these two hypotheses by undertaking a meta-analysis on published LMX studies based on North American samples and collecting survey data from two independent samples in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Results of the LMX meta-analysis do not confirm our first hypothesis. However, we find consistent support that Chinese supervisors rated the LMX relationship more favourably than subordinates did. There is support to hypothesis 2 that the perceptual discrepancy was significantly larger in a collectivistic and high power distance society (e.g., China) than in an individualistic and low power distance society (e.g., North America). Implications for theory and practice, limitations, and future research direction are discussed.
Descriptionpp. 116-154of this journal suppl. entitled: The Abstracts of the 6th Australian Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110115
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.035
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.384

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTse, HMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, WCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, PLHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, HCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, FYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:51:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:51:49Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 6th Australian Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference, Gold Coast, QLD., Australia, 30 June-3 July 2005. In Australian Journal of Psychology, 2005, v. 57 n. S1. p. 150-151-
dc.identifier.issn0004-9530-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110115-
dc.descriptionpp. 116-154of this journal suppl. entitled: The Abstracts of the 6th Australian Industrial and Organisational Psychology Conference-
dc.description.abstractBuilding on role theory, this paper examines the differences between supervisors and subordinates in their perception of their leader-member exchange relationships. More specifically, we hypothesise that (1) supervisors’ assessment of the dyadic relationships would be more favourable than the subordinates’ assessment of the same, and (2) this pattern will be more obvious in a collectivistic and high power distance society than in an individualistic and low power distance society. We test these two hypotheses by undertaking a meta-analysis on published LMX studies based on North American samples and collecting survey data from two independent samples in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). Results of the LMX meta-analysis do not confirm our first hypothesis. However, we find consistent support that Chinese supervisors rated the LMX relationship more favourably than subordinates did. There is support to hypothesis 2 that the perceptual discrepancy was significantly larger in a collectivistic and high power distance society (e.g., China) than in an individualistic and low power distance society (e.g., North America). Implications for theory and practice, limitations, and future research direction are discussed.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian Journal of Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleSupervisor-subordinate agreement in perception of leader-member exchange quality: a beautiful misunderstandingen_HK
dc.title.alternativeSupervisor-subordinate agreement in perception of LMX quality: a beautiful misunderstanding-
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYu, PLH: plhyu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, HCC: huiharry@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYu, PLH=rp00835en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHui, HCC=rp00547en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00049530600940008-
dc.identifier.hkuros112926en_HK
dc.identifier.volume57-
dc.identifier.issueS1-
dc.identifier.spage150-
dc.identifier.epage151-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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