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Conference Paper: Implied FOE from form influences human heading perception

TitleImplied FOE from form influences human heading perception
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 2008 Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008), Naples, FL., 9-14 May 2008. In Journal of Vision, v. 8 n. 6, p. 1161 How to Cite?
AbstractThe present study examines the influence of structured form information on human heading perception. Random-dot kinematograms (100 light-increment dots) were used to generate expanding optic flow (70.1°H × 70.1°V) with a focus of expansion (FOE) at −15°, 0° and 15° from the display center. Form signals were introduced into the stimulus by assigning each dot in the display a partner dot to form a dipole of a particular local orientation. Dipoles were configured to produce a radial “Glass” pattern implying a “form” FOE at −20°, −10°, 0°, 10° and 20° from the display center. The stimulus thus affords that for certain configurations form and motion information each indicates a different FOE. Observers were asked to fixate on a cross in the center of the display and clicked a mouse button to start a trial. The stimulus was displayed for 1.5 sec and observers were required to indicate their perceived heading direction along a horizontal line in the display center using a mouse-controlled probe. For 10 observers (8 naïve), for flow patterns with a motion FOE at the display center (0°), the judged heading is shifted towards the implied form FOE from the Glass pattern with a bias equivalent to a weighting of approximately 0.3. For flow patterns with a motion FOE at 15° to the left or right of the display center, a systematic effect was evident only when motion and form FOE were in same direction. No such effect was observed with anti-Glass patterns, possibly due to a weaker association between opposite-polarity dots forming dipoles. Form information plays an important role in human heading perception from optic flow. The findings are consistent with a computational procedure that weights and averages form and motion estimates of heading.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110107
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, CKJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhuu, KSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:51:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:51:28Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2008 Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008), Naples, FL., 9-14 May 2008. In Journal of Vision, v. 8 n. 6, p. 1161en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110107-
dc.description.abstractThe present study examines the influence of structured form information on human heading perception. Random-dot kinematograms (100 light-increment dots) were used to generate expanding optic flow (70.1°H × 70.1°V) with a focus of expansion (FOE) at −15°, 0° and 15° from the display center. Form signals were introduced into the stimulus by assigning each dot in the display a partner dot to form a dipole of a particular local orientation. Dipoles were configured to produce a radial “Glass” pattern implying a “form” FOE at −20°, −10°, 0°, 10° and 20° from the display center. The stimulus thus affords that for certain configurations form and motion information each indicates a different FOE. Observers were asked to fixate on a cross in the center of the display and clicked a mouse button to start a trial. The stimulus was displayed for 1.5 sec and observers were required to indicate their perceived heading direction along a horizontal line in the display center using a mouse-controlled probe. For 10 observers (8 naïve), for flow patterns with a motion FOE at the display center (0°), the judged heading is shifted towards the implied form FOE from the Glass pattern with a bias equivalent to a weighting of approximately 0.3. For flow patterns with a motion FOE at 15° to the left or right of the display center, a systematic effect was evident only when motion and form FOE were in same direction. No such effect was observed with anti-Glass patterns, possibly due to a weaker association between opposite-polarity dots forming dipoles. Form information plays an important role in human heading perception from optic flow. The findings are consistent with a computational procedure that weights and averages form and motion estimates of heading.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_HK
dc.titleImplied FOE from form influences human heading perceptionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1534-7362&volume=8&issue=6&spage=1161&epage=&date=2008&atitle=Implied+Foe+From+Form+Influences+Human+Heading+Perceptionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhuu, KS: skhuu@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: lili8816@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/8.6.1161-
dc.identifier.hkuros143194en_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage1161en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1161-

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