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Conference Paper: Early social development of subtypes of autistic children

TitleEarly social development of subtypes of autistic children
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.
Citation
The 28th International Congress of Psychology (ICP 2004), Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, Abstract no. 4083.13 How to Cite?
AbstractA total of 45 preschool autistic children matched on cognitive level and classified into one of the three subtypes of autistic children (aloof, passive, active but odd) were rated on 109 items of social-communicative behavior pertaining to joint attention, social intent, imitation, turn-taking, emotional functioning, sense of self, social response, communicative initiation, basic conversational skills, and play skills. Comparisons of patterns of ratings across the three groups provided evidence of autism as a spectrum disorder, with the subtyping roughly representing different degrees of social deficits. Profiles of social ability for each subtype and implications for early intervention were drawn.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110079
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.552

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, ITFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:50:15Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:50:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 28th International Congress of Psychology (ICP 2004), Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39 n. 5-6, Abstract no. 4083.13-
dc.identifier.issn1464-066X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110079-
dc.description.abstractA total of 45 preschool autistic children matched on cognitive level and classified into one of the three subtypes of autistic children (aloof, passive, active but odd) were rated on 109 items of social-communicative behavior pertaining to joint attention, social intent, imitation, turn-taking, emotional functioning, sense of self, social response, communicative initiation, basic conversational skills, and play skills. Comparisons of patterns of ratings across the three groups provided evidence of autism as a spectrum disorder, with the subtyping roughly representing different degrees of social deficits. Profiles of social ability for each subtype and implications for early intervention were drawn.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychologyen_HK
dc.titleEarly social development of subtypes of autistic childrenen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, ITF: itfho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, ITF=rp00556en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207594.2004.20040812-
dc.identifier.hkuros123640en_HK

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