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Conference Paper: Visual control of steering toward a goal uses heading but not path information

TitleVisual control of steering toward a goal uses heading but not path information
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/
Citation
The 2008 Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008), Naples, FL., 9-14 May 2008. In Journal of Vision, 2008, v. 8 n. 6, p. 1162 How to Cite?
AbstractInstantaneous direction of self-translation (heading) and trajectory (path) are two central features for the control of locomotion. We have shown that humans can perceive heading in the absence of path information (Li, Sweet, & Stone, JOV 2006). Here we investigate whether humans use a heading- or path-based control strategy when steering a vehicle toward a goal. We simulated locomotion over a ground plane at 2 m/s with observers' line of sight fixed with respect to the vehicle and randomly offset by ±8° to render screen-centering strategies useless. Observers used a joystick to change the curvature of the vehicle's traveling path to steer toward an environmental target under two display conditions (sparse flow: the ground was composed of random dots; dense-flow: the ground was textured). In the dense-flow condition, we examined both open- and closed-loop performance (open-loop: the target disappeared as observers initiated steering; closed-loop: the target was visible throughout the trial) while in the sparse condition, we only examined the former. For 7 observers (5 naïve), in all conditions, the maximum path curvature was several times larger than that expected if observers used a path-based strategy to point their expected path at the target and then hold curvature constant (mean curvature ratio±SE: 15.1±4.7, 9.1±1.7, & 17.3±8.2, for sparse open-loop, dense open-loop and closed-loop, respectively). Instead, observers over-steered initially and then let path curvature decrease toward zero over time with the final heading error larger for sparse-flow than for either open- or closed-loop dense-flow (mean±SE: 5.0±1.1°, 1.2±0.3°, & 1.7±0.4°, respectively). This behavior is consistent with observers steering their heading (estimated from optic flow) towards the goal. The fact that final heading error is indistinguishable in the open- and closed-loop conditions argues against a Tau-equalization strategy. Humans rely primarily on heading when steering toward a goal and not on estimated future path or time-to-contact information.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110054
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorStone, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, EKSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:49:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2008 Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2008), Naples, FL., 9-14 May 2008. In Journal of Vision, 2008, v. 8 n. 6, p. 1162en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/110054-
dc.description.abstractInstantaneous direction of self-translation (heading) and trajectory (path) are two central features for the control of locomotion. We have shown that humans can perceive heading in the absence of path information (Li, Sweet, & Stone, JOV 2006). Here we investigate whether humans use a heading- or path-based control strategy when steering a vehicle toward a goal. We simulated locomotion over a ground plane at 2 m/s with observers' line of sight fixed with respect to the vehicle and randomly offset by ±8° to render screen-centering strategies useless. Observers used a joystick to change the curvature of the vehicle's traveling path to steer toward an environmental target under two display conditions (sparse flow: the ground was composed of random dots; dense-flow: the ground was textured). In the dense-flow condition, we examined both open- and closed-loop performance (open-loop: the target disappeared as observers initiated steering; closed-loop: the target was visible throughout the trial) while in the sparse condition, we only examined the former. For 7 observers (5 naïve), in all conditions, the maximum path curvature was several times larger than that expected if observers used a path-based strategy to point their expected path at the target and then hold curvature constant (mean curvature ratio±SE: 15.1±4.7, 9.1±1.7, & 17.3±8.2, for sparse open-loop, dense open-loop and closed-loop, respectively). Instead, observers over-steered initially and then let path curvature decrease toward zero over time with the final heading error larger for sparse-flow than for either open- or closed-loop dense-flow (mean±SE: 5.0±1.1°, 1.2±0.3°, & 1.7±0.4°, respectively). This behavior is consistent with observers steering their heading (estimated from optic flow) towards the goal. The fact that final heading error is indistinguishable in the open- and closed-loop conditions argues against a Tau-equalization strategy. Humans rely primarily on heading when steering toward a goal and not on estimated future path or time-to-contact information.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociation for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. The Journal's web site is located at http://wwwjournalofvisionorg/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_HK
dc.titleVisual control of steering toward a goal uses heading but not path informationen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1534-7362&volume=8&issue=6&spage=1162&epage=&date=2008&atitle=Visual+Control+Of+Steering+Toward+A+Goal+Uses+Heading+But+Not+Path+Informationen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, L: lili8816@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, EKS: erich_chan@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, L=rp00636en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/8.6.1162-
dc.identifier.hkuros143195en_HK
dc.identifier.volume8en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1162en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1162-

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