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Conference Paper: Psychosocial adjustment of people with epilepsy

TitlePsychosocial adjustment of people with epilepsy
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.asp
Citation
The 28th International Congress of Psychology (ICP 2004), Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39, n. 5-6, p. S475, abstract no. 5006.2 How to Cite?
AbstractChildren with epilepsy have a high incidence of psychological, behavioral and psychiatric problems that risk to adversely affect their quality of life. It appears that these problems persist in adulthood. This presentation addresses this issue within a Chinese cultural context. Fifty epileptic patients completed the Washington Psychosocial Inventory, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, and a questionnaire that assessed their psychosocial difficulties and coping styles. Social factors, such as self-perception and coping strategies, were more powerful predictors of psychosocial adjustment in people with epilepsy than the medical factors associated with epilepsy. The findings showed that psychosocial maladjustment is a significant issue for people with epilepsy in Hong Kong.
DescriptionThese free journal issues entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the XXVIII INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF PSYCHOLOGY
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109983
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.276
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.552

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, V.C.Nen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:46:07Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:46:07Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 28th International Congress of Psychology (ICP 2004), Beijing, China, 8-13 August 2004. In International Journal of Psychology, 2004, v. 39, n. 5-6, p. S475, abstract no. 5006.2en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0020-7594en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109983-
dc.descriptionThese free journal issues entitled: Special Issue: Abstracts of the XXVIII INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF PSYCHOLOGY-
dc.description.abstractChildren with epilepsy have a high incidence of psychological, behavioral and psychiatric problems that risk to adversely affect their quality of life. It appears that these problems persist in adulthood. This presentation addresses this issue within a Chinese cultural context. Fifty epileptic patients completed the Washington Psychosocial Inventory, the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, and a questionnaire that assessed their psychosocial difficulties and coping styles. Social factors, such as self-perception and coping strategies, were more powerful predictors of psychosocial adjustment in people with epilepsy than the medical factors associated with epilepsy. The findings showed that psychosocial maladjustment is a significant issue for people with epilepsy in Hong Kong.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/00207594.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Psychologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Psychology. Copyright © Psychology Press.en_HK
dc.titlePsychosocial adjustment of people with epilepsyen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0020-7594&volume=39&spage=(5&epage=6):S475&date=2004&atitle=Psychosocial+adjustment+of+people+with+epilepsyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, TMC=rp00564en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00207594.2004.20040813-
dc.identifier.hkuros102170en_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5-6-
dc.identifier.spageS475, abstract no. 5006.2en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS475, abstract no. 5006.2en_HK

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