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Conference Paper: Self-concept and academic motivation of Chinese students in Hong Kong

TitleSelf-concept and academic motivation of Chinese students in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherThe Australian Association for Research in Education
Citation
The Australian Association for Research in Education Annual Conference, 2005 How to Cite?
AbstractWe examined the frame-of-reference effects of potentially important self-constructs (e.g., self-concepts, values, goals) among Grade 7 Hong Kong Chinese students (N=1950). Specifically, the study analysed how the immediate context of schoolmates’ ability affected students’ perceptions of their own ability. It was postulated that students formulated their self-concept by comparing their own performance (e.g., math achievement) with that of other students (i.e., the external frame) as well as their own performance in other academic areas (e.g., language; the internal frame). This would have negative effects on the self-concept of students studying in schools with high average student ability (big-fish-little-pond effects, BFLPE). In this study, we explored how other individual difference attributes moderate the frame-of-reference effects on self-concept. Results showed that in general stronger mastery goal, persistence strategies, and utility (value) helped to reduce the negative BFLPE, while stronger avoidance goal, and ability attribution (for Mathematics) further increased this negative BFLPE.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109871

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHau, KTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, HWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSeaton, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, ITFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:40:56Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Australian Association for Research in Education Annual Conference, 2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109871-
dc.description.abstractWe examined the frame-of-reference effects of potentially important self-constructs (e.g., self-concepts, values, goals) among Grade 7 Hong Kong Chinese students (N=1950). Specifically, the study analysed how the immediate context of schoolmates’ ability affected students’ perceptions of their own ability. It was postulated that students formulated their self-concept by comparing their own performance (e.g., math achievement) with that of other students (i.e., the external frame) as well as their own performance in other academic areas (e.g., language; the internal frame). This would have negative effects on the self-concept of students studying in schools with high average student ability (big-fish-little-pond effects, BFLPE). In this study, we explored how other individual difference attributes moderate the frame-of-reference effects on self-concept. Results showed that in general stronger mastery goal, persistence strategies, and utility (value) helped to reduce the negative BFLPE, while stronger avoidance goal, and ability attribution (for Mathematics) further increased this negative BFLPE.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Australian Association for Research in Education-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Australian Assciation for Research in Education Annual Conferenceen_HK
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleSelf-concept and academic motivation of Chinese students in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, ITF: itfho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, ITF=rp00556en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.hkuros123643en_HK

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