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Conference Paper: Figural aftereffects transfer, but are also contingent on, race categories

TitleFigural aftereffects transfer, but are also contingent on, race categories
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherScholar One, Inc.
Citation
Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, 5-10 May 2006. In Journal of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 6, p. 884 How to Cite?
AbstractRace is perceived categorically in faces. Clear boundaries separate faces perceived as belonging to one race category, e.g., Caucasian, and those perceived as belonging to another, e.g., African American (Levin & Angelone, 2002). We investigated the functional independence of these race categories by attempting to alter perception of faces from one race independently of another race. Participants were adapted to configurally distorted Chinese (or Caucasian) faces and tested for transfer of aftereffects to Caucasian (or Chinese) faces (Experiment 1). In the Experiment 2 participants were adapted simultaneously to Caucasian faces distorted one way, and Chinese faces distorted in the opposite way to determined if race-contingent aftereffects could be induced. Some transfer of aftereffects between race categories was found in Experiment 1. Perception of normality was systematically biased in the direction of the adapting distortion in most cases, regardless of which race was viewed during adaptation. In Experiment 2, perceptions of normality were biased in opposite directions for the two races. These results suggest that the perceptual system can update our face norms in a way that is insensitive to race categories. However, where a race distinction is made relevant, the perceptual system can selectively update the norms of each face category. These results present evidence that coding of race categories may rely on both shared and distinct neural populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109842
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.341
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.042

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJaquet, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorRhodes, Gen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHayward, WGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:39:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:39:41Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAnnual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, 5-10 May 2006. In Journal of Vision, 2006, v. 6 n. 6, p. 884-
dc.identifier.issn1534-7362-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109842-
dc.description.abstractRace is perceived categorically in faces. Clear boundaries separate faces perceived as belonging to one race category, e.g., Caucasian, and those perceived as belonging to another, e.g., African American (Levin & Angelone, 2002). We investigated the functional independence of these race categories by attempting to alter perception of faces from one race independently of another race. Participants were adapted to configurally distorted Chinese (or Caucasian) faces and tested for transfer of aftereffects to Caucasian (or Chinese) faces (Experiment 1). In the Experiment 2 participants were adapted simultaneously to Caucasian faces distorted one way, and Chinese faces distorted in the opposite way to determined if race-contingent aftereffects could be induced. Some transfer of aftereffects between race categories was found in Experiment 1. Perception of normality was systematically biased in the direction of the adapting distortion in most cases, regardless of which race was viewed during adaptation. In Experiment 2, perceptions of normality were biased in opposite directions for the two races. These results suggest that the perceptual system can update our face norms in a way that is insensitive to race categories. However, where a race distinction is made relevant, the perceptual system can selectively update the norms of each face category. These results present evidence that coding of race categories may rely on both shared and distinct neural populations.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherScholar One, Inc.-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visionen_HK
dc.titleFigural aftereffects transfer, but are also contingent on, race categoriesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHayward, WG: whayward@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHayward, WG=rp00630en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1167/6.6.884-
dc.identifier.hkuros116426en_HK

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