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Conference Paper: Bilingual first language acquisition and the mechanisms of substrate influence

TitleBilingual first language acquisition and the mechanisms of substrate influence
Authors
Issue Date2003
Citation
The 1st Conference of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics (SPCL 2003), University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI., 14-17 August 2003. How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper draws together two fields of study, early bilingual acquisition and language contact, showing close parallels between transfer at the individual and substrate influence at the societal level. Romaine (1996) emphasizes that ‘the bilingual individual is the ultimate locus of language contact’, while Thomason (2001) considers bilingual first language acquisition as a mechanism of contact-induced change which has been relatively little studied to date. Pursuing these two ideas, we show how the developmental patterns in bilingual Cantonese-English children parallel prominent features in a contact variety of English, namely Singapore Colloquial English, spoken by a community of native speakers (Gupta 1994). At the individual ...
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109100

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, SJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, Ven_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:07:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:07:59Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 1st Conference of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics (SPCL 2003), University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI., 14-17 August 2003.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109100-
dc.description.abstractThis paper draws together two fields of study, early bilingual acquisition and language contact, showing close parallels between transfer at the individual and substrate influence at the societal level. Romaine (1996) emphasizes that ‘the bilingual individual is the ultimate locus of language contact’, while Thomason (2001) considers bilingual first language acquisition as a mechanism of contact-induced change which has been relatively little studied to date. Pursuing these two ideas, we show how the developmental patterns in bilingual Cantonese-English children parallel prominent features in a contact variety of English, namely Singapore Colloquial English, spoken by a community of native speakers (Gupta 1994). At the individual ...-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartof1st Conference of the Society for Pidgin and Creole Linguistics, SPCL 2003en_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.titleBilingual first language acquisition and the mechanisms of substrate influenceen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMatthews, SJ: matthews@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMatthews, SJ=rp01207en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.hkuros90807en_HK

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