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Conference Paper: Detection of malingering behavior using functional MRI

TitleDetection of malingering behavior using functional MRI
Authors
KeywordsMedical sciences
Psychiatry and neurology
Issue Date2001
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg
Citation
The 7th Annual Meeting of the Organisation for Human Brain Mapping (HBM 2001), Brighton, UK., 10-14 June 2001. In NeuroImage, 2001, v. 13 n. 6 suppl., p. S698 How to Cite?
AbstractWe used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMBI) paradigm to investigate the specific neural response in the presence of feigned memory problem, and to determine if it was distinguishable from normal recall. A forced-choice memory task format was used to examine specific neural activation when feigning memory impairment. The hypothesis tested was that activation of specific neural structures involved in the cognitive control of response manipulation (prefrontal cortex and subcortical structures), selection and adoption of retrieval strategies (prefrontal cortex), and the calculation of the proportion of correct responses (frontal-parietal cortices), would be observed during the process of feigning memory impairment when tested with forced-choice memory tasks. Two fMBI studies were conducted on 5 male volunteers to obtain convergent evidence in hypothesis testing. Study 1 employed a digit memory task of a forced-choice format. During each trial, each number was exposed for 0.75 followed by visual fixation on a cross hair for 2.25 sec. Bach subject was asked to decide if the two stimuli were the same. Upon completion of this, a new number was again presented for 0.75 set followed by a cross hair for 3.25 sec. Study 2 used an autobiographic memory task, also of a forced-choice format. The procedure employed was essentially the same as that utilized in Study 1. However, this time each subject was presented with an autobiographic question followed by an answer to that question which was presented 2.25 seconds later. Bach participant was asked to identify if the answer was correct. Pressing an air pump connected to a bell in the MB console room indicated a yes response. To encourage skillful lying, two other conditions, namely, answering incorrectly and answering randomly, were added. Therefore, there were altogether four experimental conditions: answering correctly, answering incorrectly, answering randomly, and faking memory failure. By subtracting cerebral activity during recall from that obtained during intentional lying, a clear picture about the pattern of brain activation underlying lying was derived. Three blocks were repeated for each of the four conditions. The duration of each block was 46 seconds. Care was taken to ensure that the order of the experimental conditions was balanced among the 12 blocks of scanning. As expected, we observed a large increase in the volume of activation in the prefrontal regions bilaterally that was accompanied by significant activation involving both the fronto-polar prefrontal areas (BA 10) during simulated malingering. Significant activation was also seen bilaterally in the following areas of the brain: angular (BA 39) and supramarginal (BA 40) gyri of the parietal lobe, and the cingulate and caudate locations of subcortical regions. Our findings provide evidence of the existence and involvement of a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit in feigning a memory problem. Extensive examination of lying and deception detection in both normal and clinical populations using behavioral and functional imaging paradigms will provide further theoretical refinement of these findings.
DescriptionOriginally published as v. 13 n. 6, pt. 2, this supplement is Proceedings of HBM 2001
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109003
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.463
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.464

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, TMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFeng, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHou, JWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T01:03:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T01:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 7th Annual Meeting of the Organisation for Human Brain Mapping (HBM 2001), Brighton, UK., 10-14 June 2001. In NeuroImage, 2001, v. 13 n. 6 suppl., p. S698en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/109003-
dc.descriptionOriginally published as v. 13 n. 6, pt. 2, this supplement is Proceedings of HBM 2001-
dc.description.abstractWe used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMBI) paradigm to investigate the specific neural response in the presence of feigned memory problem, and to determine if it was distinguishable from normal recall. A forced-choice memory task format was used to examine specific neural activation when feigning memory impairment. The hypothesis tested was that activation of specific neural structures involved in the cognitive control of response manipulation (prefrontal cortex and subcortical structures), selection and adoption of retrieval strategies (prefrontal cortex), and the calculation of the proportion of correct responses (frontal-parietal cortices), would be observed during the process of feigning memory impairment when tested with forced-choice memory tasks. Two fMBI studies were conducted on 5 male volunteers to obtain convergent evidence in hypothesis testing. Study 1 employed a digit memory task of a forced-choice format. During each trial, each number was exposed for 0.75 followed by visual fixation on a cross hair for 2.25 sec. Bach subject was asked to decide if the two stimuli were the same. Upon completion of this, a new number was again presented for 0.75 set followed by a cross hair for 3.25 sec. Study 2 used an autobiographic memory task, also of a forced-choice format. The procedure employed was essentially the same as that utilized in Study 1. However, this time each subject was presented with an autobiographic question followed by an answer to that question which was presented 2.25 seconds later. Bach participant was asked to identify if the answer was correct. Pressing an air pump connected to a bell in the MB console room indicated a yes response. To encourage skillful lying, two other conditions, namely, answering incorrectly and answering randomly, were added. Therefore, there were altogether four experimental conditions: answering correctly, answering incorrectly, answering randomly, and faking memory failure. By subtracting cerebral activity during recall from that obtained during intentional lying, a clear picture about the pattern of brain activation underlying lying was derived. Three blocks were repeated for each of the four conditions. The duration of each block was 46 seconds. Care was taken to ensure that the order of the experimental conditions was balanced among the 12 blocks of scanning. As expected, we observed a large increase in the volume of activation in the prefrontal regions bilaterally that was accompanied by significant activation involving both the fronto-polar prefrontal areas (BA 10) during simulated malingering. Significant activation was also seen bilaterally in the following areas of the brain: angular (BA 39) and supramarginal (BA 40) gyri of the parietal lobe, and the cingulate and caudate locations of subcortical regions. Our findings provide evidence of the existence and involvement of a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit in feigning a memory problem. Extensive examination of lying and deception detection in both normal and clinical populations using behavioral and functional imaging paradigms will provide further theoretical refinement of these findings.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ynimg-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuroImageen_HK
dc.subjectMedical sciences-
dc.subjectPsychiatry and neurology-
dc.titleDetection of malingering behavior using functional MRIen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1053-8119&volume=13&issue=6, pt. 2, suppl. S &spage=S698&epage=&date=2001&atitle=Detection+of+malingering+behavior+using+functional+MRI-
dc.identifier.emailLee, TMC: tmclee@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGao, JH: jhgao@foxmail.com-
dc.identifier.hkuros63335en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74565-
dc.identifier.hkuros75552-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue6 suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageS698en_HK
dc.identifier.epageS698-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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