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Conference Paper: A decade of right liver adult-to-adult live donor liver transplantation: mid-term outcomes

TitleA decade of right liver adult-to-adult live donor liver transplantation: mid-term outcomes
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jtoc/106570021
Citation
The 13th Annual International Congress of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS 2007), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 20-23 June 2007. In Liver Transplantation, 2007, v. 13 suppl. 1, p. S106, abstract no. 154 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Right liver adult-to-adult live donor liver transplantation debuted a decade ago is now due for mid-term outcomes appraisal. Patients and methods Consecutive liver transplant cases with a minimum follow-up of 2 years in Queen Mary Hospital, the University of Hong Kong from May 1996 to December 2004 were included (N=188). The data including recipient and graft characteristics were collected prospectively and were analyzed retrospectively. From 1996 to 2000, fewer than 30 cases per year were determined early era. Results: This series had a median followup of 48 months. The early era included 28 cases and the latter era 160 cases. Recipients of the early era were slightly younger (42 yr vs. 48 yr, p = 0.002) and fewer of them suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (10.7% vs. 29.4%, p = 0.039). Disease severity was worse as refl ected by a higher proportion of recipients with hepatorenal syndrome (35.7% vs. 16.3%, p = 0.016), and higher Model of End-stage Liver Disease scores (34 vs. 26, p = 0.007). Graft characteristics were similar. The recipients of the early era had higher hospital mortalities (6/28 vs. 4/160, p = 0.001). Transplantation in the high urgency situation did not result in higher hospital mortality (5/91 vs. 5/97, p = 0.917). None of the recipients transplanted for HCC had hospital mortality (0/50 vs. 10/138, p= 0.065). On univariate analysis, the presence of HCC and transplantation in the early era were of adverse factors for survival. This was verifi ed by a multivariate analysis which indicated that early era (RR = 2.824, p = 0.015) and HCC (RR = 2.897, p = 0.005) were factors adversely affecting overall survival. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survivals were 92.5%, 86.3%, and 82.3%, respectively. When recipients with hospital mortality and transplanted for HCC were excluded, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survivals became 97.6%, 95.3%, and 95.3%, respectively. Recipients with HCC (n = 50) and only those who were within the Milan criteria (n = 34) had 1-, 3-, and 5-year survivals of 98.0%, 80.5%, and 63.4%; and 97.1%, 85.0%, and, 67.6%, respectively. Conclusion: This operation resulted in predictably high 5-year survival in particular when hospital mortality could be avoided after maturation of techniques and careful case selection of recipients with a low chance of recurrence from HCC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/108393
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.951
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.763

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChik, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, CLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, STen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-26T00:37:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-26T00:37:46Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Annual International Congress of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS 2007), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 20-23 June 2007. In Liver Transplantation, 2007, v. 13 suppl. 1, p. S106, abstract no. 154-
dc.identifier.issn1527-6465-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/108393-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Right liver adult-to-adult live donor liver transplantation debuted a decade ago is now due for mid-term outcomes appraisal. Patients and methods Consecutive liver transplant cases with a minimum follow-up of 2 years in Queen Mary Hospital, the University of Hong Kong from May 1996 to December 2004 were included (N=188). The data including recipient and graft characteristics were collected prospectively and were analyzed retrospectively. From 1996 to 2000, fewer than 30 cases per year were determined early era. Results: This series had a median followup of 48 months. The early era included 28 cases and the latter era 160 cases. Recipients of the early era were slightly younger (42 yr vs. 48 yr, p = 0.002) and fewer of them suffered from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) (10.7% vs. 29.4%, p = 0.039). Disease severity was worse as refl ected by a higher proportion of recipients with hepatorenal syndrome (35.7% vs. 16.3%, p = 0.016), and higher Model of End-stage Liver Disease scores (34 vs. 26, p = 0.007). Graft characteristics were similar. The recipients of the early era had higher hospital mortalities (6/28 vs. 4/160, p = 0.001). Transplantation in the high urgency situation did not result in higher hospital mortality (5/91 vs. 5/97, p = 0.917). None of the recipients transplanted for HCC had hospital mortality (0/50 vs. 10/138, p= 0.065). On univariate analysis, the presence of HCC and transplantation in the early era were of adverse factors for survival. This was verifi ed by a multivariate analysis which indicated that early era (RR = 2.824, p = 0.015) and HCC (RR = 2.897, p = 0.005) were factors adversely affecting overall survival. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survivals were 92.5%, 86.3%, and 82.3%, respectively. When recipients with hospital mortality and transplanted for HCC were excluded, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survivals became 97.6%, 95.3%, and 95.3%, respectively. Recipients with HCC (n = 50) and only those who were within the Milan criteria (n = 34) had 1-, 3-, and 5-year survivals of 98.0%, 80.5%, and 63.4%; and 97.1%, 85.0%, and, 67.6%, respectively. Conclusion: This operation resulted in predictably high 5-year survival in particular when hospital mortality could be avoided after maturation of techniques and careful case selection of recipients with a low chance of recurrence from HCC.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jtoc/106570021-
dc.relation.ispartofLiver Transplantationen_HK
dc.rightsLiver Transplantation. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.-
dc.titleA decade of right liver adult-to-adult live donor liver transplantation: mid-term outcomesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1527-6465&volume=13&issue=Suppl.1&spage=S106 Abstract no. 154&epage=&date=2007&atitle=A+decade+of+right+liver+adult-to-adult+live+donor+liver+transplantation:+mid-term+outcomes+(Abstract)-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SC: chanlsc@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiu, CL: clliu@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLo, CM: chungmlo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, ST: stfan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLo, CM=rp00412en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFan, ST=rp00355en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lt.21269-
dc.identifier.hkuros135538en_HK
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS106, abstract no. 154-
dc.identifier.epageS106, abstract no. 154-

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