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Conference Paper: Results from a strategy encoding temporal fine structure

TitleResults from a strategy encoding temporal fine structure
Authors
Issue Date2007
Citation
The 2007 Conference on Implantable Auditory Prostheses, Lake Tahoe, CA, 15-20 July 2007 How to Cite?
AbstractCurrent cochlear implant stimulation strategies are widely based on the continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) paradigm. With CIS, temporal fine structure is only crudely represented in the stimulation pattern, and pitch is encoded primarily in the place of stimulation and to a limited extent in the temporal fluctuations of the channel envelopes. However, fine structure information is a crucial ingredient for the perception of music and of tonal languages, as demonstrated in studies with normal hearing subjects. In the fine structure strategy presented, “channel specific sampling sequences” (CSSS) or pulse-packages are applied to the apical electrodes, while the remaining basal electrodes carry CIS-like stimuli. The pulse sequences are triggered by the zero-crossings of the corresponding filter channel outputs and scaled with the channel envelopes. Thus, both fine time structure and envelope information are represented on CSSS channels. The new strategy has been evaluated in two experiments: In a first experiment, pitch discrimination and scaling abilities were compared for the fine structure strategy and CIS in four MED-EL implant recipients. For pure tone stimuli below 300 Hz, pitch discrimination with CIS was limited. Conversely, CSSS seems to add robust temporal cues to pitch at low frequencies, supporting better discrimination. In a second experiment, speech reception measures were taken for MEDEL implant recipients and native speakers of Cantonese Chinese in Hong Kong. Preliminary results from a pilot study showed substantial improvements in the perception of lexical tones with the fine structure strategy over CIS and triggered a more extensive survey. Data from this ongoing study will be presented. Support provided by the Christian Doppler Research Association
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/107432

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchatzer, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorZierhofer, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKrenmayr, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, DKKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKals, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGrundhammer, Ten_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T23:57:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T23:57:24Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2007 Conference on Implantable Auditory Prostheses, Lake Tahoe, CA, 15-20 July 2007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/107432-
dc.description.abstractCurrent cochlear implant stimulation strategies are widely based on the continuous interleaved sampling (CIS) paradigm. With CIS, temporal fine structure is only crudely represented in the stimulation pattern, and pitch is encoded primarily in the place of stimulation and to a limited extent in the temporal fluctuations of the channel envelopes. However, fine structure information is a crucial ingredient for the perception of music and of tonal languages, as demonstrated in studies with normal hearing subjects. In the fine structure strategy presented, “channel specific sampling sequences” (CSSS) or pulse-packages are applied to the apical electrodes, while the remaining basal electrodes carry CIS-like stimuli. The pulse sequences are triggered by the zero-crossings of the corresponding filter channel outputs and scaled with the channel envelopes. Thus, both fine time structure and envelope information are represented on CSSS channels. The new strategy has been evaluated in two experiments: In a first experiment, pitch discrimination and scaling abilities were compared for the fine structure strategy and CIS in four MED-EL implant recipients. For pure tone stimuli below 300 Hz, pitch discrimination with CIS was limited. Conversely, CSSS seems to add robust temporal cues to pitch at low frequencies, supporting better discrimination. In a second experiment, speech reception measures were taken for MEDEL implant recipients and native speakers of Cantonese Chinese in Hong Kong. Preliminary results from a pilot study showed substantial improvements in the perception of lexical tones with the fine structure strategy over CIS and triggered a more extensive survey. Data from this ongoing study will be presented. Support provided by the Christian Doppler Research Association-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofThe 2007 Conference on Implantable Auditory Prosthesesen_HK
dc.titleResults from a strategy encoding temporal fine structureen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, DKK: kinkwau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAu, DKK=rp00385en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros148051en_HK

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