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Conference Paper: Analysis of gene expression, alternative splicing and chromosomal translocation and their implications in cancer by expressed sequence tags

TitleAnalysis of gene expression, alternative splicing and chromosomal translocation and their implications in cancer by expressed sequence tags
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Citation
Experimental Biology 2006, San Francisco, CA, 1-5 April 2006. In The FASEB Journal, 2006, v, 20 n. 5, p. LB112 How to Cite?
AbstractAs one of the major high-throughput gene expression databases, dbEST contains enormous amount of expression data from numerous tissues. Currently, there are about five million EST sequences of human origin in dbEST, and half of which were derived from tumor tissues. The random sampling nature of EST sequencing and sequencing length for each clone render EST data tremendous advantage in finding alternative splicing events, chromosomal translocation, and differential gene expression as well as their implications in cancer. In this study we have explored the feasibilities in using ESTs to gain cancer-related information and discussed the methodologies and related issues. Example results were presented on the up-regulation of rac1b, correlation of expression levels between non-muscle β- and γ-actins, and translocation events for TEL and AML1, as well as alternative splicing of CD44 as discovered by EST data analysis. Our study indicates that, with proper analysis, EST data could provide valuable information for the better understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer biology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/106396
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.299
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.775

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYang, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorXie, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorHildebrandt, JD-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T23:14:00Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T23:14:00Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationExperimental Biology 2006, San Francisco, CA, 1-5 April 2006. In The FASEB Journal, 2006, v, 20 n. 5, p. LB112-
dc.identifier.issn0892-6638-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/106396-
dc.description.abstractAs one of the major high-throughput gene expression databases, dbEST contains enormous amount of expression data from numerous tissues. Currently, there are about five million EST sequences of human origin in dbEST, and half of which were derived from tumor tissues. The random sampling nature of EST sequencing and sequencing length for each clone render EST data tremendous advantage in finding alternative splicing events, chromosomal translocation, and differential gene expression as well as their implications in cancer. In this study we have explored the feasibilities in using ESTs to gain cancer-related information and discussed the methodologies and related issues. Example results were presented on the up-regulation of rac1b, correlation of expression levels between non-muscle β- and γ-actins, and translocation events for TEL and AML1, as well as alternative splicing of CD44 as discovered by EST data analysis. Our study indicates that, with proper analysis, EST data could provide valuable information for the better understanding of tumorigenesis and cancer biology.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherFederation of American Societies for Experimental Biology-
dc.relation.ispartofThe FASEB Journalen_HK
dc.titleAnalysis of gene expression, alternative splicing and chromosomal translocation and their implications in cancer by expressed sequence tagsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYang, W: yangwl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYang, W=rp00524en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros129322en_HK

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