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Conference Paper: Transgenic expression of testis-specific protein Y-encoded-like 2 triggers developmental and behavioral changes

TitleTransgenic expression of testis-specific protein Y-encoded-like 2 triggers developmental and behavioral changes
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/modo
Citation
The 15th International Society of Developmental Biologist Congress 2005, Sydney, Australia, 3-7 September 2005. In Mechanisms of Development, 2005, v. 122 n. Suppl. 1, p. S117-S118, abstract no. 07-P018 How to Cite?
AbstractNeuronal apoptosis is an indispensable process for normal development of the central nervous system. During neonatal brain development, cell death occurs in neurons which re-enter the cell cycle but the triggering mechanism remains unknown. Proteins of the nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) family have been implicated in the control of the cell cycle. Here we raised antibodies against Testis-Specific Protein Y-encodedlike 2 (Tspyl2), a novel protein with a NAP domain, and found that Tspyl2 is ubiquitously expressed in the neonatal brain with mostly cytoplasmic and some nuclear staining. Interestingly, neurons which exhibited apoptotic features also expressed Tspyl2 in the nucleus. In transgenic mice with brain-specific overexpression of human TSPYL2, more cells entered the cell cycle and underwent apoptosis during neonatal brain development. A recent report has shown that Tspyl2 is widely expressed in the adult brain and the protein level of Tspyl2 in cultured neurons is regulated by synaptic activities (Wang, 2004. Neuron 42:113). Our transgenic mice died with a dehydrated appearance at weaning age, but could be rescued with hydrated food. Our data suggest a role of Tspyl2 in controlling neuronal loss during normal brain development. Furthermore, the transgenic animals are useful for further investigation on the role of Tspyl2 in neuronal function. [The work described in this paper was substantially supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU7323/03M).]
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/106173
ISBN
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.041
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.368

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYick, LWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T23:04:39Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T23:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 15th International Society of Developmental Biologist Congress 2005, Sydney, Australia, 3-7 September 2005. In Mechanisms of Development, 2005, v. 122 n. Suppl. 1, p. S117-S118, abstract no. 07-P018en_HK
dc.identifier.isbn1 877040 35 5-
dc.identifier.issn0925-4773-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/106173-
dc.description.abstractNeuronal apoptosis is an indispensable process for normal development of the central nervous system. During neonatal brain development, cell death occurs in neurons which re-enter the cell cycle but the triggering mechanism remains unknown. Proteins of the nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) family have been implicated in the control of the cell cycle. Here we raised antibodies against Testis-Specific Protein Y-encodedlike 2 (Tspyl2), a novel protein with a NAP domain, and found that Tspyl2 is ubiquitously expressed in the neonatal brain with mostly cytoplasmic and some nuclear staining. Interestingly, neurons which exhibited apoptotic features also expressed Tspyl2 in the nucleus. In transgenic mice with brain-specific overexpression of human TSPYL2, more cells entered the cell cycle and underwent apoptosis during neonatal brain development. A recent report has shown that Tspyl2 is widely expressed in the adult brain and the protein level of Tspyl2 in cultured neurons is regulated by synaptic activities (Wang, 2004. Neuron 42:113). Our transgenic mice died with a dehydrated appearance at weaning age, but could be rescued with hydrated food. Our data suggest a role of Tspyl2 in controlling neuronal loss during normal brain development. Furthermore, the transgenic animals are useful for further investigation on the role of Tspyl2 in neuronal function. [The work described in this paper was substantially supported by a grant from the Research Grants Council of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China (Project No. HKU7323/03M).]-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/modo-
dc.relation.ispartofMechanisms of Developmenten_HK
dc.titleTransgenic expression of testis-specific protein Y-encoded-like 2 triggers developmental and behavioral changesen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SY: sychan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: achankw@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYick, LW: yickkevinhk@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, SW: swanfong@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SY=rp00356en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mod.2005.06.010-
dc.identifier.hkuros106533en_HK
dc.identifier.volume122en_HK
dc.identifier.spage117en_HK

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