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Conference Paper: Epidemiology and treatment outcome of childhood ependymoma: report from the hong kong pediatric hematology oncology study group

TitleEpidemiology and treatment outcome of childhood ependymoma: report from the hong kong pediatric hematology oncology study group
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherOxford University Press
Citation
The 13th International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO 2008), Chicago, IL, 29 June-2 July 2008. In Neuro-Oncology, 2008, v. 10 n. 3, p. 413 Abstract no. EPI 11 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: Ependymoma is the fourth commonest childhood brain tumor, but there was little information on its epidemiology and outcome in Chinese children. We reviewed our data and provide some insight in this aspect. Materials and Methods: Prospective collection of childhood cancer data was performed since early 1990s from the five major public hospitals, which captured almost all children with cancers locally. Standard data accrual was performed by designated data managers. The data was further crosschecked with the Hong Kong Cancer Registry database, which collected all the local pathology reports for cancers. Chemotherapy regimen was baby-POG before 2005 and SIOP-99 after 2004. Results: From January 1995 to December 2006 (12 years), a total of 20 cases of childhood (<18 years) ependymoma were diagnosed. Their median age was 3.4 years (range, 0.5–16.3 years), and male:female ratio was 8:12. Excluding one non-Chinese and one .15 years, the incidence of ependymoma was 1.3/1,000,000 per year for children <15 years. The distribution was fairly even between the cerebral (n 5 9) and posterior fossa (n 5 9), and two were in the spinal cord region. Chemotherapy was given to 10 children, mostly for children ,3 years in order to delay cranial radiation therapy (RT) (n 5 6) or for children with incomplete surgical excision (n 5 4). The 5-year overall survival rate was 69% but was 87.5% for cerebral and 53.3% for posterior fossa location (p 5 0.14), mainly because seven of nine (77%) children with posterior fossa ependymoma were ,3 years (median age, 1.5 years; range, 0.5–5.1 years) and RT was postponed. On the contrary, only two of nine children with cerebral ependymomas were ,3 years (median, 5.8 years; range, 2.3–16.3 years). Eight of 10 patients with either cerebral or posterior fossa ependymoma who did not receive upfront cranial RT (,3 years or parents refused) relapsed, irrespective of the completeness of the initial surgical resection or chemotherapy used. The two patients with spinal ependymoma were treated with surgery alone, and one relapsed; he was successfully re-treated with surgery plus local RT. Conclusion: Ependymoma is less common among Chinese children, and the majority of our children with posterior fossa ependymoma were ,3 years. Without upfront cranial RT, 80% of our cerebral or cerebellar ependymomas relapsed. The data managers were supported by the Children’s Cancer Foundation of Hong Kong.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105881
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.371
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.196

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShing, MMKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, HLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, ACWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, CKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHa, SYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, CKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:52:33Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:52:33Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology (ISPNO 2008), Chicago, IL, 29 June-2 July 2008. In Neuro-Oncology, 2008, v. 10 n. 3, p. 413 Abstract no. EPI 11-
dc.identifier.issn1522-8517-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105881-
dc.description.abstractObjective: Ependymoma is the fourth commonest childhood brain tumor, but there was little information on its epidemiology and outcome in Chinese children. We reviewed our data and provide some insight in this aspect. Materials and Methods: Prospective collection of childhood cancer data was performed since early 1990s from the five major public hospitals, which captured almost all children with cancers locally. Standard data accrual was performed by designated data managers. The data was further crosschecked with the Hong Kong Cancer Registry database, which collected all the local pathology reports for cancers. Chemotherapy regimen was baby-POG before 2005 and SIOP-99 after 2004. Results: From January 1995 to December 2006 (12 years), a total of 20 cases of childhood (<18 years) ependymoma were diagnosed. Their median age was 3.4 years (range, 0.5–16.3 years), and male:female ratio was 8:12. Excluding one non-Chinese and one .15 years, the incidence of ependymoma was 1.3/1,000,000 per year for children <15 years. The distribution was fairly even between the cerebral (n 5 9) and posterior fossa (n 5 9), and two were in the spinal cord region. Chemotherapy was given to 10 children, mostly for children ,3 years in order to delay cranial radiation therapy (RT) (n 5 6) or for children with incomplete surgical excision (n 5 4). The 5-year overall survival rate was 69% but was 87.5% for cerebral and 53.3% for posterior fossa location (p 5 0.14), mainly because seven of nine (77%) children with posterior fossa ependymoma were ,3 years (median age, 1.5 years; range, 0.5–5.1 years) and RT was postponed. On the contrary, only two of nine children with cerebral ependymomas were ,3 years (median, 5.8 years; range, 2.3–16.3 years). Eight of 10 patients with either cerebral or posterior fossa ependymoma who did not receive upfront cranial RT (,3 years or parents refused) relapsed, irrespective of the completeness of the initial surgical resection or chemotherapy used. The two patients with spinal ependymoma were treated with surgery alone, and one relapsed; he was successfully re-treated with surgery plus local RT. Conclusion: Ependymoma is less common among Chinese children, and the majority of our children with posterior fossa ependymoma were ,3 years. Without upfront cranial RT, 80% of our cerebral or cerebellar ependymomas relapsed. The data managers were supported by the Children’s Cancer Foundation of Hong Kong.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.relation.ispartofNeuro-Oncologyen_HK
dc.titleEpidemiology and treatment outcome of childhood ependymoma: report from the hong kong pediatric hematology oncology study groupen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHa, SY: syha@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1215/15228517-2008-024-
dc.identifier.hkuros145801en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142678-

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