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Conference Paper: Sustained attentional performance in patients with schizophrenia

TitleSustained attentional performance in patients with schizophrenia
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 11th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Davos, Switzerland, 24 February-1 March 2002. In Schizophrenia Research, 2002, v. 53 n. 3 suppl. 1, p. 135-136, abstract A293 How to Cite?
AbstractTwo tests of sustained attention were administered to three groups of participants (n = 51 each): chronic schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and healthy controls, matched for age, education and gender. The monotone counting task required participants to count the total number of tones in a series of trial. The sustained attention response to task (SART) required participants to refrain from responding to randomly presented targeted stimuli (digit) but to respond to non-targeted stimuli. Three major findings were found in these comparisons. In general, patients with schizophrenia performed the worst in both tasks among the three groups. Second, schizophrenic patients performed significantly worse in monotone counting than the SART [t950 = 2.479, p = 0.017]. The effect size was found to be modest to large (0.46). Third, a reverse pattern was observed in patients with TBI: they tended to have a higher proportion of SART correct response and lower proportion of monotone counting [t(50) = 1.792, p = 0.079; effect size of 0.27]. However, such reversed pattern disappeared after partialling out the accuracy–speed trade-off component. The SART performance was consistently and significantly worse than the monotone counting task among the three groups (p < 0.005.. Taken together, these findings suggest that although both the monotone counting task and SART were impaired in patients with schizophrenia and TBI, the severity and modality of such impairments were qualitatively different in these patient groups.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105502
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, RYLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, HKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:36:47Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:36:47Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 11th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia, Davos, Switzerland, 24 February-1 March 2002. In Schizophrenia Research, 2002, v. 53 n. 3 suppl. 1, p. 135-136, abstract A293en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105502-
dc.description.abstractTwo tests of sustained attention were administered to three groups of participants (n = 51 each): chronic schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and healthy controls, matched for age, education and gender. The monotone counting task required participants to count the total number of tones in a series of trial. The sustained attention response to task (SART) required participants to refrain from responding to randomly presented targeted stimuli (digit) but to respond to non-targeted stimuli. Three major findings were found in these comparisons. In general, patients with schizophrenia performed the worst in both tasks among the three groups. Second, schizophrenic patients performed significantly worse in monotone counting than the SART [t950 = 2.479, p = 0.017]. The effect size was found to be modest to large (0.46). Third, a reverse pattern was observed in patients with TBI: they tended to have a higher proportion of SART correct response and lower proportion of monotone counting [t(50) = 1.792, p = 0.079; effect size of 0.27]. However, such reversed pattern disappeared after partialling out the accuracy–speed trade-off component. The SART performance was consistently and significantly worse than the monotone counting task among the three groups (p < 0.005.. Taken together, these findings suggest that although both the monotone counting task and SART were impaired in patients with schizophrenia and TBI, the severity and modality of such impairments were qualitatively different in these patient groups.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_HK
dc.rightsSchizophrenia Research. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.titleSustained attentional performance in patients with schizophreniaen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0920-9964&volume=53&issue=3&spage=135&epage=&date=2002&atitle=Sustained+attentional+performance+in+patients+with+schizophreniaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, RCK: ckrchan@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, RYL: rylchen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, HK: cheung_hk@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0920-9964(01)00381-4-
dc.identifier.hkuros73329en_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3 suppl. 1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage135, abstract A293en_HK
dc.identifier.epage136-

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