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Conference Paper: Fractionating the executive function in schizophrenia: does it still hold true for medication-naive sample?

TitleFractionating the executive function in schizophrenia: does it still hold true for medication-naive sample?
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 13th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research, Davos, Switzerland, 4-10 February 2006. In Schizophrenia Research, 2006, v. 81 suppl., p. 230-231, abstract no. 494 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Preliminary studies suggest that the phenomenon of fractionation of executive functions takes places in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, we do not get much evidence to support this claim in first-onset medication-naı¨ve sample. In this study, we attempted to examine whether this phenomenon still holds true in medication-naı¨ve schizophrenia. METHODS: A sample of 78 medicatio- naı¨ve patients with schizophrenia and another sample of 60 healthy controls were recruited for the present study. All subjects completed a comprehensive set of executive function tests assessing initiation, sustained attention, online updating, switching, attention allocation, inhibition, and background cognition. RESULTS: The executive function of patients with first-episode schizophrenia was found to be compromised relative to healthy controls. However, unlike patients with established schizophrenia, first episode patients exhibited only a limited deficit in sustained attention component. Moreover, the majority of executive function components did not correlate with intellectual functioning and memory impairment in a sub-group of patients without intellectual impairment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the phenomenon of fractionation of executive functions still holds true in the medication-nay¨ve sample. In particular, these patients show a specific pattern of executive dysfunction compared to healthy controls and patients with an established illness. This differential breakdown in executive function components is unlikely to be an artifact of general intellectual decline or memory impairment in schizophrenia.
DescriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research
Poster Presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105421
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, RCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:33:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:33:27Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 13th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research, Davos, Switzerland, 4-10 February 2006. In Schizophrenia Research, 2006, v. 81 suppl., p. 230-231, abstract no. 494en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105421-
dc.descriptionThis journal suppl. entitled: XIIIth Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia Research-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Preliminary studies suggest that the phenomenon of fractionation of executive functions takes places in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, we do not get much evidence to support this claim in first-onset medication-naı¨ve sample. In this study, we attempted to examine whether this phenomenon still holds true in medication-naı¨ve schizophrenia. METHODS: A sample of 78 medicatio- naı¨ve patients with schizophrenia and another sample of 60 healthy controls were recruited for the present study. All subjects completed a comprehensive set of executive function tests assessing initiation, sustained attention, online updating, switching, attention allocation, inhibition, and background cognition. RESULTS: The executive function of patients with first-episode schizophrenia was found to be compromised relative to healthy controls. However, unlike patients with established schizophrenia, first episode patients exhibited only a limited deficit in sustained attention component. Moreover, the majority of executive function components did not correlate with intellectual functioning and memory impairment in a sub-group of patients without intellectual impairment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the phenomenon of fractionation of executive functions still holds true in the medication-nay¨ve sample. In particular, these patients show a specific pattern of executive dysfunction compared to healthy controls and patients with an established illness. This differential breakdown in executive function components is unlikely to be an artifact of general intellectual decline or memory impairment in schizophrenia.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_HK
dc.rightsSchizophrenia Research. Copyright © Elsevier BV.-
dc.titleFractionating the executive function in schizophrenia: does it still hold true for medication-naive sample?en_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, RCK: ckrchan@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, CW: lawcw@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2006.01.006-
dc.identifier.hkuros143559en_HK
dc.identifier.volume81en_HK
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spage230, abstract no. 494en_HK
dc.identifier.epage231-

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