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Conference Paper: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: Preliminary Data

TitleA Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: Preliminary Data
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAssociated Professional Sleep Society. The Journal's website is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
The 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Society (SLEEP 2007), Minneapolis, MN., 9-14 June 2007. In Sleep, 2007, v. 30 Abstract suppl., p. A240, abstract no. 0706 How to Cite?
AbstractINTRODUCTION: Acupuncture is a commonly used complementary therapy for insomnia. Previous studies were limited by the lack of placebo acupuncture group, proper diagnostic and blinding procedure and objective sleep assessment. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electro-acupuncture in primary insomnia using placebo acupuncture as control. METHODS: Chinese adults aged 18-65 yr with DSM-IV primary insomnia for at least 3 months were randomized to receive electro-acupuncture or placebo acupuncture for 9 sessions in 3 weeks. The acupoints used were bilateral Ear Shenmen, Sishencong EX-HN1, Anmian, and unilateral Yingtong EX-HN3 and Baihui DU20. Streitberger placebo needles were used in the placebo group. The number, duration and frequency of treatment session were the same for the two groups. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and overnight polysomnography were used for screening. Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (primary outcome measure), sleep diary and adverse event reporting were done at baseline, after the 5th treatment, after the 9th treatment and 1-week post-treatment. Actigraphy, PSQI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sheehan Disability Index were done at baseline and 1-week post-treatment. Significant treatment effect is defined as a difference of ≥ 5 ISI points between the two groups. A sample size of 20 in each group has a power of 85-100% to detect the significant treatment effect using ANCOVA. RESULTS: This preliminary analysis was based on the first 10 subjects in each group. Subjects receiving electro-acupuncture had significantly higher sleep efficiency by sleep diaries than those with placebo acupuncture at 1-week post-treatment (ANCOVA: F = 5.4, p = 0.03) with difference between means of 12.8% (95% CI: 2.2%-23.3%). No significant difference in other outcome measures between the two groups. No adverse event was reported in either group. CONCLUSION: Electro-acupuncture seems to be effective and well tolerated in the short-term treatment of primary insomnia.
DescriptionCategory J - Sleep Disorders - Insomnia
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105417
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYap, TGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:33:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:33:17Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Society (SLEEP 2007), Minneapolis, MN., 9-14 June 2007. In Sleep, 2007, v. 30 Abstract suppl., p. A240, abstract no. 0706-
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105417-
dc.descriptionCategory J - Sleep Disorders - Insomnia-
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Acupuncture is a commonly used complementary therapy for insomnia. Previous studies were limited by the lack of placebo acupuncture group, proper diagnostic and blinding procedure and objective sleep assessment. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of electro-acupuncture in primary insomnia using placebo acupuncture as control. METHODS: Chinese adults aged 18-65 yr with DSM-IV primary insomnia for at least 3 months were randomized to receive electro-acupuncture or placebo acupuncture for 9 sessions in 3 weeks. The acupoints used were bilateral Ear Shenmen, Sishencong EX-HN1, Anmian, and unilateral Yingtong EX-HN3 and Baihui DU20. Streitberger placebo needles were used in the placebo group. The number, duration and frequency of treatment session were the same for the two groups. Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and overnight polysomnography were used for screening. Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) (primary outcome measure), sleep diary and adverse event reporting were done at baseline, after the 5th treatment, after the 9th treatment and 1-week post-treatment. Actigraphy, PSQI, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Sheehan Disability Index were done at baseline and 1-week post-treatment. Significant treatment effect is defined as a difference of ≥ 5 ISI points between the two groups. A sample size of 20 in each group has a power of 85-100% to detect the significant treatment effect using ANCOVA. RESULTS: This preliminary analysis was based on the first 10 subjects in each group. Subjects receiving electro-acupuncture had significantly higher sleep efficiency by sleep diaries than those with placebo acupuncture at 1-week post-treatment (ANCOVA: F = 5.4, p = 0.03) with difference between means of 12.8% (95% CI: 2.2%-23.3%). No significant difference in other outcome measures between the two groups. No adverse event was reported in either group. CONCLUSION: Electro-acupuncture seems to be effective and well tolerated in the short-term treatment of primary insomnia.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAssociated Professional Sleep Society. The Journal's website is located at http://www.journalsleep.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_HK
dc.rightsSleep. Copyright © Associated Professional Sleep Societies.-
dc.titleA Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial of Acupuncture for Primary Insomnia: Preliminary Dataen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros135639en_HK
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issueAbstract suppl.-
dc.identifier.spageA240, abstract no. 0706-
dc.identifier.epageA240, abstract no. 0706-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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