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Conference Paper: Social anxiety and ideas/delusions of reference in early psychosis

TitleSocial anxiety and ideas/delusions of reference in early psychosis
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres
Citation
The 14th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders, Montreux, Switzerland, 3–7 February 2008. In Schizophrenia Research, 2008, v. 98 suppl., p. 182-183 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is increasingly recognized as a comorbid condition in early psychosis. Putative explanations include SAD as a psychological response emerging during recovery, a component per se or vulnerability marker for psychosis. Alternatively, it could also be an epiphenomenon of conceptually related symptoms, such as subthreshold suspiciousness and ideas/delusions of reference (I/DOR). This study describes the relationships between SAD and psychotic symptoms in stable patients. Methods: A consecutive sample of 137 outpatients with early psychosis was interviewed using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) and an I/DOR scale validated in Hong Kong Chinese. General symptoms were rated by patients' attending psychiatrists using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder. SAD was defined using LSAS cutoff as previously described. Results: SAD was found in 45.3% of outpatients. Compared with patients in remission (defined using PANSS criteria, n = 106), SAD is more prevalent (39.6% vs. 64.5%) and severe (LSAS 28.7 vs. 44.1, both p = 0.01) in symptomatic patients (n = 31). LSAS correlated with all dimensions of the I/DOR scale. Patients with existing I/DOR are more likely to be socially anxious (OR 3.8, p = 0.00) and scored higher on LSAS (mean, 42.2) than those who no longer (28.3) or have never experienced I/DOR (26.9). Specific positive symptoms associated with social anxiety are PANSS suspiciousness (r = 0.28) and SAPS I/DOR (r = 0.31, both p < 0.01) but not other delusions or hallucinations. Insight is not associated with SAD. Conclusions: SAD is more common and severe in symptomatic than remitted outpatients. It covariates with I/DOR, and is not affected by insight. Results suggest that SAD could be understood as closely related to I/DOR. Whether this relationship is correlational or epiphenomenological will require further exploration.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105379
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.304

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, GHYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, CPYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:31:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:31:42Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 14th Biennial Winter Workshop on Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders, Montreux, Switzerland, 3–7 February 2008. In Schizophrenia Research, 2008, v. 98 suppl., p. 182-183en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105379-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is increasingly recognized as a comorbid condition in early psychosis. Putative explanations include SAD as a psychological response emerging during recovery, a component per se or vulnerability marker for psychosis. Alternatively, it could also be an epiphenomenon of conceptually related symptoms, such as subthreshold suspiciousness and ideas/delusions of reference (I/DOR). This study describes the relationships between SAD and psychotic symptoms in stable patients. Methods: A consecutive sample of 137 outpatients with early psychosis was interviewed using the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) and an I/DOR scale validated in Hong Kong Chinese. General symptoms were rated by patients' attending psychiatrists using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia and Scale to Assess Unawareness of Mental Disorder. SAD was defined using LSAS cutoff as previously described. Results: SAD was found in 45.3% of outpatients. Compared with patients in remission (defined using PANSS criteria, n = 106), SAD is more prevalent (39.6% vs. 64.5%) and severe (LSAS 28.7 vs. 44.1, both p = 0.01) in symptomatic patients (n = 31). LSAS correlated with all dimensions of the I/DOR scale. Patients with existing I/DOR are more likely to be socially anxious (OR 3.8, p = 0.00) and scored higher on LSAS (mean, 42.2) than those who no longer (28.3) or have never experienced I/DOR (26.9). Specific positive symptoms associated with social anxiety are PANSS suspiciousness (r = 0.28) and SAPS I/DOR (r = 0.31, both p < 0.01) but not other delusions or hallucinations. Insight is not associated with SAD. Conclusions: SAD is more common and severe in symptomatic than remitted outpatients. It covariates with I/DOR, and is not affected by insight. Results suggest that SAD could be understood as closely related to I/DOR. Whether this relationship is correlational or epiphenomenological will require further exploration.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/schres-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Researchen_HK
dc.titleSocial anxiety and ideas/delusions of reference in early psychosisen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, GHY: ggloriawong@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, CPY: chiupyc@hkucc.hku.hk, cindychiu@gmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, CW: lawcw@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, CPY=rp00291en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2007.12.429-
dc.identifier.hkuros142207en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros142850-
dc.identifier.volume98en_HK
dc.identifier.issuesuppl.-
dc.identifier.spage182en_HK
dc.identifier.epage183-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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