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Conference Paper: The differential role of glutamate receptors in postnatal spatial recognition

TitleThe differential role of glutamate receptors in postnatal spatial recognition
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
Citation
The 8th Biennial Meeting of Asia-Pacific Society for Neurochemistry, Shanghai, China, 24-26 June 2008. In Journal of Neurochemistry, 2008, v. 106 n. Suppl 1, p. 6 How to Cite?
AbstractFormation of the neural network for recognition of spatial orientation depends on precise coordination of synaptic integration at different stages of development. Within the vestibular nucleus, the proportion of gravity-related neurons expressing NMDAR or AMPAR subunits changed during postnatal development. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments further demonstrated developmental change in the contribution of glutamate receptors to miniature- and evoked-excitatory postsynaptic currents: NMDAR predominates in neonates while AMPAR in young adults. Developmental switches in NMDAR subunits were also found. Furthermore, ionotropic glutamate receptors were involved in the conversion of silent synapses to functional ones. The induction of such synaptic events occurred in correlation with the ability of vestibular nuclear neurons to encode spatial orientations. With perinatal blockade of NMDAR in the vestibular nucleus, we documented a postnatal period critical for the orderly establishment of a gravity-related horizontal spatial map in the inferior olive. The impact of such perturbation on motor learning behavior during this critical period of susceptibility will be discussed. Taken together, our results suggest that refinement of the developing vestibular circuitry during a postnatal critical period is crucial for coherent recognition of gravity-related spatial orientations in the mature animal. Acknowledgments: Supported by HK RGC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105097
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.842
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.021

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, CHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, CWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, YCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:20:05Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 8th Biennial Meeting of Asia-Pacific Society for Neurochemistry, Shanghai, China, 24-26 June 2008. In Journal of Neurochemistry, 2008, v. 106 n. Suppl 1, p. 6-
dc.identifier.issn0022-3042-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/105097-
dc.description.abstractFormation of the neural network for recognition of spatial orientation depends on precise coordination of synaptic integration at different stages of development. Within the vestibular nucleus, the proportion of gravity-related neurons expressing NMDAR or AMPAR subunits changed during postnatal development. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments further demonstrated developmental change in the contribution of glutamate receptors to miniature- and evoked-excitatory postsynaptic currents: NMDAR predominates in neonates while AMPAR in young adults. Developmental switches in NMDAR subunits were also found. Furthermore, ionotropic glutamate receptors were involved in the conversion of silent synapses to functional ones. The induction of such synaptic events occurred in correlation with the ability of vestibular nuclear neurons to encode spatial orientations. With perinatal blockade of NMDAR in the vestibular nucleus, we documented a postnatal period critical for the orderly establishment of a gravity-related horizontal spatial map in the inferior olive. The impact of such perturbation on motor learning behavior during this critical period of susceptibility will be discussed. Taken together, our results suggest that refinement of the developing vestibular circuitry during a postnatal critical period is crucial for coherent recognition of gravity-related spatial orientations in the mature animal. Acknowledgments: Supported by HK RGC.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Neurochemistryen_HK
dc.titleThe differential role of glutamate receptors in postnatal spatial recognitionen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, CH: chlaib@HKUSUA.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, SK: estherlai@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, C: lic5@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMa, CW: h0494175@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, YC: tseyc@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, CH=rp00396en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-4159.2008.05367.x-
dc.identifier.hkuros149870en_HK

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