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Conference Paper: Expression of secretin in the rat prenatal and postnatal cerebellum

TitleExpression of secretin in the rat prenatal and postnatal cerebellum
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/NSG
Citation
The Hong Kong Society of Neurosciences 24th Annual Scientific Meeting, Hong Kong, 13-14 January 2005. In Neurosignals, 2006, v. 15 n. 3, p. 124 How to Cite?
AbstractThe brain-gut peptide secretin has been used to treat subjects suffering from the neurodevelopmental disorder autism despite the controversy on its therapeutic efficacy. Recent evidence indicated that secretin and its receptors are expressed particularly prominently in the cerebellum, an area consistently reported to be affected in autism. This raises the interesting hypothesis that secretin may play a role in the normal development of the cerebellum and perhaps the etiology of autism. As a first step to prove this hypothesis we examined the expression of secretin peptide in the prenatal and neonatal rat cerebella. Standard immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against rat secretin was employed to study the expression of secretin in prenatal rat cerebella at E11, E14, E17, E20 and E22, as well as neonatal rat cerebella at P1, P4, P7, P11 and P14. Immunoreactive cells were visualized by 3,3-diaminobenzide tetrahydrochloride. Specificity of immunostainings was examined by performing controls either in the absence of primary antibody or liquid phase pre-absorption of secretin antiserum with secretin peptide. There were widespread immunopositive signals in neuronal somata in the cerebella at these developmental stages. As early as the prenatal stage at E17, secretin was found to be consistently expressed in the Purkinje cell layer. At prenatal stage E22 and all the neonatal stages being examined in this study, immunoreactivity for secretin was prominently detected in the medial deep nucleus of the developing cerebellum. These results suggest that secretin plays a role in the development of the cerebellum at neonatal and early postnatal stages. Furthermore, during these developmental stages, the Purkinje neuron is a source of secretin. Acknowledgement: Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (N_CUHK 427/03).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/104963
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.593
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.763

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, YSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, JJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChow, BKCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYung, WHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T22:14:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T22:14:40Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe Hong Kong Society of Neurosciences 24th Annual Scientific Meeting, Hong Kong, 13-14 January 2005. In Neurosignals, 2006, v. 15 n. 3, p. 124en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1424-862Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/104963-
dc.description.abstractThe brain-gut peptide secretin has been used to treat subjects suffering from the neurodevelopmental disorder autism despite the controversy on its therapeutic efficacy. Recent evidence indicated that secretin and its receptors are expressed particularly prominently in the cerebellum, an area consistently reported to be affected in autism. This raises the interesting hypothesis that secretin may play a role in the normal development of the cerebellum and perhaps the etiology of autism. As a first step to prove this hypothesis we examined the expression of secretin peptide in the prenatal and neonatal rat cerebella. Standard immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against rat secretin was employed to study the expression of secretin in prenatal rat cerebella at E11, E14, E17, E20 and E22, as well as neonatal rat cerebella at P1, P4, P7, P11 and P14. Immunoreactive cells were visualized by 3,3-diaminobenzide tetrahydrochloride. Specificity of immunostainings was examined by performing controls either in the absence of primary antibody or liquid phase pre-absorption of secretin antiserum with secretin peptide. There were widespread immunopositive signals in neuronal somata in the cerebella at these developmental stages. As early as the prenatal stage at E17, secretin was found to be consistently expressed in the Purkinje cell layer. At prenatal stage E22 and all the neonatal stages being examined in this study, immunoreactivity for secretin was prominently detected in the medial deep nucleus of the developing cerebellum. These results suggest that secretin plays a role in the development of the cerebellum at neonatal and early postnatal stages. Furthermore, during these developmental stages, the Purkinje neuron is a source of secretin. Acknowledgement: Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (N_CUHK 427/03).-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/NSGen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNeurosignalsen_HK
dc.rightsNeurosignals. Copyright © S Karger AG.en_HK
dc.titleExpression of secretin in the rat prenatal and postnatal cerebellumen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, MY: myleesuki01@yahoo.com.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, BKC: bkcc@hkusua.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MY=rp01536en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000095356-
dc.identifier.hkuros137691en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros136183-
dc.identifier.volume15en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage124(P-13/24)en_HK
dc.identifier.epage124(P-13/24)-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.description.otherThe 24th and the 25th Scientific Meeting of the Hong Kong Society of Neurosciences, Hong Kong, 5-6 December 2005. In Neurosignals, 2006, v. 15 n. 3, p. 124(P-13/24)-

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