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Conference Paper: Immunohistochemical markers, are we having too many choices?

TitleImmunohistochemical markers, are we having too many choices?
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherMalaysian Society of Pathologists
Citation
The 24th World Congress of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 20-24 August 2007. In The Malaysian Journal of Pathology, 2007, v. 29 n. Supplement A, p. 182 How to Cite?
AbstractAs more and more antibodies are made available for immunohistochemical studies, pathologists are increasing being challenged to make a rational choice from multiple antibodies all of which are reputably suited for the same or similar diagnostic application. A recent review was conducted into the practice of a group of histopathologists working in a general teaching hospital in how they had used the three antibodies, namely smooth muscle actin, calponin and p63, each of which could be used as a marker for myoepithelial differentiation. The findings are presented and discussed. Immunohistochemical studies recently carried out in the histopathology laboratory of the Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong were recorded in a computerized database. The database was searched for all stains performed for actin, calponin, and p63 from Jan 2005 to the end of April 2007. Parameters selected were the accession number complete with the tissue block number, antibodies stained and the pathologist ordering the stains. A total of 1148 blocks were stained for actin (n=803), calponin (n=127), and p63 (n=574). Pathologists varied widely in their choice of applying these antibodies. While it is uncommon to use all 3 antibodies on a single block (n=38), one pathologist alone was responsible for 76% (n=29) of this usage. Slightly more blocks were stained for p63 alone (n=291) then those stained in combinations with actin and/or calponin (n=283). Significant variation in the use of the 3 antibodies was observed among a group of 24 pathologists working in a single public institution. Stereotypic patterns of applying immunohistochemical stains may result in excessive procedures. A system to monitor and provide timely feedback on the usage of immunohistochemical markers with the adoption of common protocols would effect cost cuts and more efficient running of laboratory services.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/104435
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.754
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.321

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, GSWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T21:52:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T21:52:59Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 24th World Congress of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 20-24 August 2007. In The Malaysian Journal of Pathology, 2007, v. 29 n. Supplement A, p. 182-
dc.identifier.issn0126-8635-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/104435-
dc.description.abstractAs more and more antibodies are made available for immunohistochemical studies, pathologists are increasing being challenged to make a rational choice from multiple antibodies all of which are reputably suited for the same or similar diagnostic application. A recent review was conducted into the practice of a group of histopathologists working in a general teaching hospital in how they had used the three antibodies, namely smooth muscle actin, calponin and p63, each of which could be used as a marker for myoepithelial differentiation. The findings are presented and discussed. Immunohistochemical studies recently carried out in the histopathology laboratory of the Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong were recorded in a computerized database. The database was searched for all stains performed for actin, calponin, and p63 from Jan 2005 to the end of April 2007. Parameters selected were the accession number complete with the tissue block number, antibodies stained and the pathologist ordering the stains. A total of 1148 blocks were stained for actin (n=803), calponin (n=127), and p63 (n=574). Pathologists varied widely in their choice of applying these antibodies. While it is uncommon to use all 3 antibodies on a single block (n=38), one pathologist alone was responsible for 76% (n=29) of this usage. Slightly more blocks were stained for p63 alone (n=291) then those stained in combinations with actin and/or calponin (n=283). Significant variation in the use of the 3 antibodies was observed among a group of 24 pathologists working in a single public institution. Stereotypic patterns of applying immunohistochemical stains may result in excessive procedures. A system to monitor and provide timely feedback on the usage of immunohistochemical markers with the adoption of common protocols would effect cost cuts and more efficient running of laboratory services.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMalaysian Society of Pathologists-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Malaysian Journal of Pathologyen_HK
dc.titleImmunohistochemical markers, are we having too many choices?en_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KW: hrmtckw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, GSW: chanswg@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid18426038-
dc.identifier.hkuros150614en_HK

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