File Download
Supplementary

Book: Old masters repainted : Wu Zhen (1280-1354) : prime objects and accretions

TitleOld masters repainted : Wu Zhen (1280-1354) : prime objects and accretions
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherHong Kong : Hong Kong University Press
AbstractThe study of Chinese painting in Taiwan, China and America today centres largely around works ascribed to celebrated old masters. These have been passed down over the centuries in private and imperial collections. Over the past millennium collectors acquired paintings as an index to their mental and spiritual cultivation which served to enhance upward social mobility. For artists, on the other hand, copying a masterpiece that could be mistaken for the original brought the highest praise, and those able to create inspiring variations on favoured old masters could lay claim to the status of master themselves. The need among collectors for ancient paintings and the widespread ability among painters to work in ancient styles created an active commerce where works by less inspired painters affixed with celebrated names were circulated as masterpieces. Countless such attributions have been gathered into famous collections, and today continue to vie for pride of place in major art centres. After intense close-up examination of groups of attributions, Joan Stanley-Baker shows that an overwhelming proportion of works assigned to pre-seventeenth century artists are of later vintage, made from within one to several centuries after their putative dates. Stanley-Baker's uncompromising premise that all attributions to old masters must remain suspect until shown to be genuine beyond reasonable doubt has given her enquiry a rare intellectual edge. Combining for the first time three hitherto distinct traditions of appraisal and analysis, she introduces a system of checks and balances that facilitates the identification of original works and the dating of posthumous additions with a greater degree of assurance than has been heretofore evinced in either traditional connoisseurship or contemporary scholarship. Turning a new leaf in art history, she views the oeuvre ascribed to an old master as a centuries-long series of images that reflect the changing perceptions of his style and persona. She deals with the traditionally avoided reality of accretions by introducing categories of stylistic distance that separate later additions from original prime objects
DescriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p.[481]-507) and index
SubjectWu, Chen,--1280-1354--Criticism and interpretation
Painting, Chinese
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/10354
ISBN
Other Identifiers

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorStanley-Baker, Joanen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2006-06-22T09:53:57Z-
dc.date.available2006-06-22T09:53:57Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifierhttp://eproxy.lib.hku.hk/login?url=http://lib.hku.hk/cgi-bin/hkupress/title.cgi?isbn=9622093027en_HK
dc.identifier.isbn9622093027en_HK
dc.identifier.otherocm65353074en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/10354-
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (p.[481]-507) and indexen_HK
dc.description.abstractThe study of Chinese painting in Taiwan, China and America today centres largely around works ascribed to celebrated old masters. These have been passed down over the centuries in private and imperial collections. Over the past millennium collectors acquired paintings as an index to their mental and spiritual cultivation which served to enhance upward social mobility. For artists, on the other hand, copying a masterpiece that could be mistaken for the original brought the highest praise, and those able to create inspiring variations on favoured old masters could lay claim to the status of master themselves. The need among collectors for ancient paintings and the widespread ability among painters to work in ancient styles created an active commerce where works by less inspired painters affixed with celebrated names were circulated as masterpieces. Countless such attributions have been gathered into famous collections, and today continue to vie for pride of place in major art centres. After intense close-up examination of groups of attributions, Joan Stanley-Baker shows that an overwhelming proportion of works assigned to pre-seventeenth century artists are of later vintage, made from within one to several centuries after their putative dates. Stanley-Baker's uncompromising premise that all attributions to old masters must remain suspect until shown to be genuine beyond reasonable doubt has given her enquiry a rare intellectual edge. Combining for the first time three hitherto distinct traditions of appraisal and analysis, she introduces a system of checks and balances that facilitates the identification of original works and the dating of posthumous additions with a greater degree of assurance than has been heretofore evinced in either traditional connoisseurship or contemporary scholarship. Turning a new leaf in art history, she views the oeuvre ascribed to an old master as a centuries-long series of images that reflect the changing perceptions of his style and persona. She deals with the traditionally avoided reality of accretions by introducing categories of stylistic distance that separate later additions from original prime objectsen_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsList of Illustrationsen_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAcknowledgementsen_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsForeword / Roger Goepperen_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsPreface / Erik Zurcheren_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsPrologue / Ernst van de Weteringen_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsA Note to the Readeren_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents16 Conclusion p365en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsBibliography p479en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsGlossary p509en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsIndex p523en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents1 Methodological Considerations p3en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents2 Traditional Chinese Connoisseurship p11en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents3 Japanese Contributions to Studies in Chinese Painting p19en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents4 Western Traditions in Chinese Painting Studies p29en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents5 Prime Objects and Image-Change Through Processes of Evolution, Alteration and Accretion p35en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents6 Significant Criteria for Period Style p43en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents7 Personal Style: Focusing on the Master p73en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents8 In Search of Prime Objects: Yuan Landscapes Matching Earliest Sources p95en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents9 Two Anonymous Yuan Paintings p127en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents10 Systems Check: Identifying Prime Bamboo Paintings by Defined Criteria p141en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents11 Graphology of Prime Objects and Recensions: New Perspectives in Calligraphy Analyses p155en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents12 Altered Images in Landscape Paintings p189en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents13 Altered Images in Bamboo Paintings p213en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents14 Accretions in Landscape Imagery p235en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontents15 Accretions in Bamboo Manuals p297en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix A Stroke-Based and Wash-Based Modes in Landscape Painting p375en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix B Wu Zhen and the Hanlin Chongting Ascribed to Dong Yuan p379en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix C Proportions and Silk-Widths p389en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix D Measurement and Condition of the Mozhupu Leaves p395en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix E 'Copies After Wu Zhen' in China and Japan p397en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix F Wu Zhen Seals p407en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix G Xiang Yuanbian Seals p411en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsAppendix H Catalogue of Works Examined p417en_HK
dc.description.tableofcontentsEpilogue: On Perception p467en_HK
dc.format.extentxxii, 536 p. : ill. ; 29 cmen_HK
dc.format.extent430 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen_HK
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherHong Kong : Hong Kong University Pressen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDigital Editions from Hong Kong University Pressen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsHKU students and staff onlyen_HK
dc.subject.ddc753.1025B W9 Sen_HK
dc.subject.lcshWu, Chen,--1280-1354--Criticism and interpretationen_HK
dc.subject.lcshPainting, Chineseen_HK
dc.titleOld masters repainted : Wu Zhen (1280-1354) : prime objects and accretionsen_HK
dc.typeBooken_HK
dc.identifier.hkulb3487065en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats