File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

Conference Paper: Ecology and evolution of influenza A (H5N1) virus in Asia: Evidence from systematic influenza surveillance

TitleEcology and evolution of influenza A (H5N1) virus in Asia: Evidence from systematic influenza surveillance
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherInternational Medical Press Ltd.
Citation
The 2007 International Scientific Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza (Options-6), Toronto, ON., Canada, 17-23 June 2007. In Conference Proceedings, 2007, p. 128-130 How to Cite?
AbstractThe development of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses in poultry in Eurasia accompanied with the increase in human infection in 2006 and the recent reemergence of poultry outbreaks throughout the region, suggests that the virus has not been effectively contained and that the pandemic threat persists. Virological and epidemiological findings from our surveillance in live-poultry markets conducted over the last seven years in southern China has provided a comprehensive view of the ecology and evolution of H5N1 influenza viruses and revealed that they are endemic in different types of market poultry. Genetic and antigenic analyses have also demonstrated the dynamic evolution of these viruses in the region, with repeated introductions from southern China to neighboring regions, including Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. A further dramatic spread of the virus westwards throughout Central and Southern Asia, Europe and Africa was also seen after detection of an initial outbreak in wild birds at Qinghai Lake in Central China, in line with our predictions. Genetic analyses revealed that after the H5N1 influenza viruses had established and been endemic several years, they developed into regionally distinct sublineages that allowed us to further trace their transmission pathways. However, recent surveillance data has revealed the emergence and predominance of a single H5N1 virus sublineage in poultry since late 2005 that has gradually replaced those previously detected multiple regional distinct sublineages in China. These viruses have already transmitted to neighboring regions thereby resulting in a new transmission and outbreak wave in Southeast Asia. The persistence of H5N1 virus since it first caused human disease in Hong Kong 11 years ago, as demonstrated by its endemicity over a large geographical region, along with repeated disease outbreaks in both poultry and humans indicates that it will be a long-term and difficult task to bring this virus under control in the absence of well developed disease control systems.
DescriptionOral Presentations - Genetic and Antigenic Evolution
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/103297
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFan, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T21:06:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T21:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2007 International Scientific Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza (Options-6), Toronto, ON., Canada, 17-23 June 2007. In Conference Proceedings, 2007, p. 128-130-
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-901-769-15-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/103297-
dc.descriptionOral Presentations - Genetic and Antigenic Evolution-
dc.description.abstractThe development of highly pathogenic avian influenza A (H5N1) viruses in poultry in Eurasia accompanied with the increase in human infection in 2006 and the recent reemergence of poultry outbreaks throughout the region, suggests that the virus has not been effectively contained and that the pandemic threat persists. Virological and epidemiological findings from our surveillance in live-poultry markets conducted over the last seven years in southern China has provided a comprehensive view of the ecology and evolution of H5N1 influenza viruses and revealed that they are endemic in different types of market poultry. Genetic and antigenic analyses have also demonstrated the dynamic evolution of these viruses in the region, with repeated introductions from southern China to neighboring regions, including Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Vietnam. A further dramatic spread of the virus westwards throughout Central and Southern Asia, Europe and Africa was also seen after detection of an initial outbreak in wild birds at Qinghai Lake in Central China, in line with our predictions. Genetic analyses revealed that after the H5N1 influenza viruses had established and been endemic several years, they developed into regionally distinct sublineages that allowed us to further trace their transmission pathways. However, recent surveillance data has revealed the emergence and predominance of a single H5N1 virus sublineage in poultry since late 2005 that has gradually replaced those previously detected multiple regional distinct sublineages in China. These viruses have already transmitted to neighboring regions thereby resulting in a new transmission and outbreak wave in Southeast Asia. The persistence of H5N1 virus since it first caused human disease in Hong Kong 11 years ago, as demonstrated by its endemicity over a large geographical region, along with repeated disease outbreaks in both poultry and humans indicates that it will be a long-term and difficult task to bring this virus under control in the absence of well developed disease control systems.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Medical Press Ltd.-
dc.relation.ispartofOptions for the Control of Influenza VI: Proceedings of the International Conference on Options for the Control of Influenza VI held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, June 17-23, 2007en_HK
dc.titleEcology and evolution of influenza A (H5N1) virus in Asia: Evidence from systematic influenza surveillanceen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJ: gjsmith@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFan, X: fanxiaohui63@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJ=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros132384en_HK
dc.identifier.spage128-
dc.identifier.epage130-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats