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Conference Paper: Characterization of H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from pigs in southern China

TitleCharacterization of H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from pigs in southern China
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherInternational Medical Press. The Conference Proceedings' website is located at https://isirv.org/site/index.php/isirv-publications?id=38
Citation
The 2007 International Scientific Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza (Options-6), Toronto, ON., Canada, 17-23 June 2007. In Conference Proceedings, 2007, p. 340-342 How to Cite?
AbstractHuman-like H3N2 influenza viruses have repeatedly transmitted to domestic pigs in different regions of the world, but it is still not certain whether any of those variants have become established in pig populations. The detection of different subtypes of avian influenza viruses from pigs makes it an ideal candidate for the genesis of a possible reassortant virus with both human and avian gene segments. However, whether pigs could act as a “mixing vessel” for a possible pandemic virus remains unanswered. Long-term influenza surveillance in pigs in southern China revealed that H3N2 influenza viruses were regularly detected from domestic pigs from 1998 to 2003. Antigenic analysis of representative strains revealed that two distinguishable groups of H3N2 influenza viruses were present in pigs during this period: a contemporary human-like viruses (represented by Sydney/5/97), and Port Chalmers/1/73-like (PC-like) viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the representative strains confirmed those two groups. In general, the PC-like viruses were most closely related to those H3N2 reassortants recognized from European pigs since the mid-1980s, while the remaining isolates were most closely related to those contemporary human H3N2 viruses. It is interesting to note that one PC-like isolate contained a classical swine H1N1-like NP gene, Sw/HK/1197/02, suggesting that after introduction to pigs in southern China the European swine H3N2 virus further reassorted with local swine virus. The contemporary humanlike H3N2 viruses isolated from pig appeared to have resulted from repeated introduction from humans to pigs. Interestingly, one isolate (Sw/HK/NS1128/03) clustered with those human isolates detected in the early 1990s. These findings suggesting that some recent human H3N2 variants may be maintained long-term in pig populations in southern China. The present study provides updated information on the role of pigs in the interspecies transmission and genetic reassortment of influenza viruses in this region.
DescriptionPoster Presentations: Animal Influenza Ecology
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/103112
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQin, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorMa, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShortridge, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T20:58:29Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T20:58:29Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 2007 International Scientific Conference of Options for the Control of Influenza (Options-6), Toronto, ON., Canada, 17-23 June 2007. In Conference Proceedings, 2007, p. 340-342-
dc.identifier.isbn78-1-901-769-15-6-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/103112-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentations: Animal Influenza Ecology-
dc.description.abstractHuman-like H3N2 influenza viruses have repeatedly transmitted to domestic pigs in different regions of the world, but it is still not certain whether any of those variants have become established in pig populations. The detection of different subtypes of avian influenza viruses from pigs makes it an ideal candidate for the genesis of a possible reassortant virus with both human and avian gene segments. However, whether pigs could act as a “mixing vessel” for a possible pandemic virus remains unanswered. Long-term influenza surveillance in pigs in southern China revealed that H3N2 influenza viruses were regularly detected from domestic pigs from 1998 to 2003. Antigenic analysis of representative strains revealed that two distinguishable groups of H3N2 influenza viruses were present in pigs during this period: a contemporary human-like viruses (represented by Sydney/5/97), and Port Chalmers/1/73-like (PC-like) viruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the representative strains confirmed those two groups. In general, the PC-like viruses were most closely related to those H3N2 reassortants recognized from European pigs since the mid-1980s, while the remaining isolates were most closely related to those contemporary human H3N2 viruses. It is interesting to note that one PC-like isolate contained a classical swine H1N1-like NP gene, Sw/HK/1197/02, suggesting that after introduction to pigs in southern China the European swine H3N2 virus further reassorted with local swine virus. The contemporary humanlike H3N2 viruses isolated from pig appeared to have resulted from repeated introduction from humans to pigs. Interestingly, one isolate (Sw/HK/NS1128/03) clustered with those human isolates detected in the early 1990s. These findings suggesting that some recent human H3N2 variants may be maintained long-term in pig populations in southern China. The present study provides updated information on the role of pigs in the interspecies transmission and genetic reassortment of influenza viruses in this region.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInternational Medical Press. The Conference Proceedings' website is located at https://isirv.org/site/index.php/isirv-publications?id=38-
dc.relation.ispartofOptions for the Control of Influenza VI: Proceedings of the International Conference on Options for the Control of Influenza VI held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada June 17-23, 2007en_HK
dc.titleCharacterization of H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from pigs in southern Chinaen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailQin, K: kunqin@hkusua.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailMa, SK: mask@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJ: gjsmith@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, J: zhangajx@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailShortridge, KF: microgen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJ=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, J=rp00413en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros132394en_HK
dc.identifier.spage340-
dc.identifier.epage342-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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