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Conference Paper: Access to care and its impact on personal provider continuity

TitleAccess to care and its impact on personal provider continuity
Authors
Issue Date2004
Citation
The 17th WONCA World Conference for Family Doctors (Wonca 2004), Orlando, FL, 13–17 October 2004 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: Good and appropriate access to care is a prerequisite to achieving personal provider continuity. With changes within health care systems and the changing work patterns of doctors in many countries, access to a personal provider is no longer guaranteed. Yet, there may be a number of other reasons why patients either seek care from their usual provider or decide not to get care from one provider on a regular basis. Up to date study in contrasting primary care settings will help elucidate this issue. Aim. To identify patients' reasons for seeking care from a particular primary care doctor in four countries. METHODS: Pilot survey in typical general practice settings in Australia, the UK, Hong Kong and Germany. The one-page questionnaire includes: demographics, socio-economic status, access to care and doctor-patient stability, general health, morbidity profile, patient's consideration to see a particular doctor, relationship with their usual provider and trust in their usual provider. RESULTS: Preliminary findings confirm that this is a very live issue for patients today. Full analysis will be available in September 2004. DISCUSSION: This pilot study seems likely to clarify the nature of patients' priorities for personal continuity in primary care in the new millennium. We expect to justify a more extensive and definitive study in a wider range of primary care settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/102883

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSturmberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, GKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGill, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, TPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTrader, JMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T20:48:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T20:48:42Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 17th WONCA World Conference for Family Doctors (Wonca 2004), Orlando, FL, 13–17 October 2004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/102883-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Good and appropriate access to care is a prerequisite to achieving personal provider continuity. With changes within health care systems and the changing work patterns of doctors in many countries, access to a personal provider is no longer guaranteed. Yet, there may be a number of other reasons why patients either seek care from their usual provider or decide not to get care from one provider on a regular basis. Up to date study in contrasting primary care settings will help elucidate this issue. Aim. To identify patients' reasons for seeking care from a particular primary care doctor in four countries. METHODS: Pilot survey in typical general practice settings in Australia, the UK, Hong Kong and Germany. The one-page questionnaire includes: demographics, socio-economic status, access to care and doctor-patient stability, general health, morbidity profile, patient's consideration to see a particular doctor, relationship with their usual provider and trust in their usual provider. RESULTS: Preliminary findings confirm that this is a very live issue for patients today. Full analysis will be available in September 2004. DISCUSSION: This pilot study seems likely to clarify the nature of patients' priorities for personal continuity in primary care in the new millennium. We expect to justify a more extensive and definitive study in a wider range of primary care settings.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWONCA World Conference for Family Doctors, Wonca 2004en_HK
dc.titleAccess to care and its impact on personal provider continuityen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros103469en_HK

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