File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
  • Find via Find It@HKUL

Conference Paper: Identification of two novel translocations t(14;20)(q32;q12) and t(2;14)(q23;q32) involving immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus in gastric lymphoma

TitleIdentification of two novel translocations t(14;20)(q32;q12) and t(2;14)(q23;q32) involving immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus in gastric lymphoma
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research
Citation
The 97th AACR Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., 1-5 April 2006. In Cancer Research, 2006, v. 66 n. 8S, p. 1234 Abstract no. 5261 How to Cite?
AbstractGastric B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (GL) is the most common extra-nodal lymphoma in Hong Kong Chinese. Many subtypes of B-cell lymphomas are associated with specific chromosomal translocations, which may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of disease. In lymphomas of mature B-cells, these translocations frequently involve the immunoglobulin (IG) loci, most often involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene at band 14q32.3, and are usually caused by errors in two developmentally regulated DNA recombination processes: V(D)J and class switch recombination. Since studies on the chromosomal translocations in lymphoid malignancies have led to the discovery of novel proto-oncogenes, this study was carried out to provide opportunity for the identification of new genes that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of GL. Using the LSI IgH dual color, break apart rearrangement probe (Vysis Inc.) for interphase FISH, we first identified the GL cases with chromosomal breakage at either the J segments or within switch sequences of the IgH locus that is associated with 14q32 translocations involving a variety of other loci. To clone novel IgH translocation breakpoints at IgHJ, 5’ Sμ and 3’ to the Sμ, Sγ1-4, and Sα1-2 regions, we employed the long distance inverse-PCR (LDI-PCR) approach to the DNA extracted from the GL cases with translocation involving the IgH locus. IgH translocation breakpoints were then cloned and sequenced. To determine the frequency of each novel translocation identified in this study, specific primers were designed across the translocation breakpoints to perform direct PCR on genomic DNA of 58 GL cases. In addition, 39 cases of nodal and other non-gastric extra-nodal lymphomas were also investigated for the presence of these translocations. Significantly, two novel recurrent chromosomal translocations t(14;20)(q32;q12) and t(2;14)(q23;q32) were identified, involving the IgH J6 and IgH γ3 switch respectively. t(14;20)(q32;q12) was found to be present in 3.4% (2/58) of GL cases and in 5.1% (2/39) of other nodal and non-gastric extra-nodal cases. t(2;14)(q23;q32) was found to be only present in GL cases (17.2%; 10/58) and not in any other nodal and non-gastric extra-nodal cases. Current studies are being carried out to identify the specific genes in the proximity of these translocation breakpoints whose expression may be altered as the results of these translocations since the principal molecular consequences of IgH translocations are deregulation and/or overexpression of the incoming gene. These studies might help us to discover new oncogenes that may play an important role in the genesis of normal and malignant B-cells.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101627
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.556
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.372

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, BHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuo, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAu, WYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWan, TSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, WYWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChu, KMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, RHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSrivastava, Gen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T19:57:21Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T19:57:21Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 97th AACR Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., 1-5 April 2006. In Cancer Research, 2006, v. 66 n. 8S, p. 1234 Abstract no. 5261-
dc.identifier.issn0008-5472-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101627-
dc.description.abstractGastric B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (GL) is the most common extra-nodal lymphoma in Hong Kong Chinese. Many subtypes of B-cell lymphomas are associated with specific chromosomal translocations, which may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of disease. In lymphomas of mature B-cells, these translocations frequently involve the immunoglobulin (IG) loci, most often involving the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) gene at band 14q32.3, and are usually caused by errors in two developmentally regulated DNA recombination processes: V(D)J and class switch recombination. Since studies on the chromosomal translocations in lymphoid malignancies have led to the discovery of novel proto-oncogenes, this study was carried out to provide opportunity for the identification of new genes that may play an important role in the pathogenesis of GL. Using the LSI IgH dual color, break apart rearrangement probe (Vysis Inc.) for interphase FISH, we first identified the GL cases with chromosomal breakage at either the J segments or within switch sequences of the IgH locus that is associated with 14q32 translocations involving a variety of other loci. To clone novel IgH translocation breakpoints at IgHJ, 5’ Sμ and 3’ to the Sμ, Sγ1-4, and Sα1-2 regions, we employed the long distance inverse-PCR (LDI-PCR) approach to the DNA extracted from the GL cases with translocation involving the IgH locus. IgH translocation breakpoints were then cloned and sequenced. To determine the frequency of each novel translocation identified in this study, specific primers were designed across the translocation breakpoints to perform direct PCR on genomic DNA of 58 GL cases. In addition, 39 cases of nodal and other non-gastric extra-nodal lymphomas were also investigated for the presence of these translocations. Significantly, two novel recurrent chromosomal translocations t(14;20)(q32;q12) and t(2;14)(q23;q32) were identified, involving the IgH J6 and IgH γ3 switch respectively. t(14;20)(q32;q12) was found to be present in 3.4% (2/58) of GL cases and in 5.1% (2/39) of other nodal and non-gastric extra-nodal cases. t(2;14)(q23;q32) was found to be only present in GL cases (17.2%; 10/58) and not in any other nodal and non-gastric extra-nodal cases. Current studies are being carried out to identify the specific genes in the proximity of these translocation breakpoints whose expression may be altered as the results of these translocations since the principal molecular consequences of IgH translocations are deregulation and/or overexpression of the incoming gene. These studies might help us to discover new oncogenes that may play an important role in the genesis of normal and malignant B-cells.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association for Cancer Research-
dc.relation.ispartofCancer Researchen_HK
dc.titleIdentification of two novel translocations t(14;20)(q32;q12) and t(2;14)(q23;q32) involving immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus in gastric lymphomaen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, BH: h0107868@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuo, T: huan95@yahoo.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAu, WY: auwing@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, KY: kywonga@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWan, TSK: wantsk@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, WYW: wywchen@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChu, KM: chukm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, LC: chanlc@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL: ylkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiang, RHS: rliang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailSrivastava, G: gopesh@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChu, KM=rp00435en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, RHS=rp00345en_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySrivastava, G=rp00365en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros121195en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats