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Conference Paper: Decreased cortical activation during rectal distention in patients with functional constipation with normal rectal compliance

TitleDecreased cortical activation during rectal distention in patients with functional constipation with normal rectal compliance
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastro
Citation
Digestive Disease Week 2007 and the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, Washington DC, USA, 19-24 May 2007. In Gastroenterology, 2007, v. 132 n. 4, Suppl. 2, p. A-23, abstract no. 119 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Patients with chronic constipation have loss of or diminished urge sensation. The underlying cortical processing for the alteration of urge sensation is unknown. We postulated there might be abnormal or diminished cortical processing in patients with constipation. Aim: to investigate cortical processing in patients with functional constipation. Methods: Patients with functional constipation (n=19) and normal healthy subjects (n=13) were recruited. The rectal compliance in both group was determined using barostat. The mean urge sensation of the normal subjects were calculated and then the subliminal, liminal and supraliminal pressures were determined. Patients were required to press a button indicating urge or strong sensation. Functional MRI based on the Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) effect carried out in a 3T MRI System was performed for both groups with the barostat connected. The distention paradigm consisted of subliminal, liminal and supraliminal pressures interleaved with rest period. The software SPM99 was used for data analysis. Results: There was no difference in sex (p=0.6), age (p=0.15) or rectal compliace (6.6 ± 3.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.6 ml/mmHg, p=0.064) in the constipated and control groups. The mean urge sensation of the healthy subjects was 30mmHg, therefore the subliminal, liminal, and supraliminal pressures were 15mmHg, 30mmHg, and 45mmHg, respectively. The cortical areas represented at subliminal and supraliminal pressures were similar in both groups. However, the volume of cortical activity at parietal lobe and precuneus was lower in constipated subjects at liminal pressure (P<0.003). There was frontal and limbic lobe activation in the normal subjects at urge sensation but not in constipated subjects (p<0.0034). Conclusion: Patient with functional constipation have impaired afferent pathway leading to abnormal urge sensation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101322
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 18.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.170

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, AOOen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, WMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, YHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, SKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, BCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-25T19:44:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-25T19:44:56Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDigestive Disease Week 2007 and the 108th Annual Meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, Washington DC, USA, 19-24 May 2007. In Gastroenterology, 2007, v. 132 n. 4, Suppl. 2, p. A-23, abstract no. 119en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0016-5085en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/101322-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Patients with chronic constipation have loss of or diminished urge sensation. The underlying cortical processing for the alteration of urge sensation is unknown. We postulated there might be abnormal or diminished cortical processing in patients with constipation. Aim: to investigate cortical processing in patients with functional constipation. Methods: Patients with functional constipation (n=19) and normal healthy subjects (n=13) were recruited. The rectal compliance in both group was determined using barostat. The mean urge sensation of the normal subjects were calculated and then the subliminal, liminal and supraliminal pressures were determined. Patients were required to press a button indicating urge or strong sensation. Functional MRI based on the Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) effect carried out in a 3T MRI System was performed for both groups with the barostat connected. The distention paradigm consisted of subliminal, liminal and supraliminal pressures interleaved with rest period. The software SPM99 was used for data analysis. Results: There was no difference in sex (p=0.6), age (p=0.15) or rectal compliace (6.6 ± 3.7 vs 6.0 ± 1.6 ml/mmHg, p=0.064) in the constipated and control groups. The mean urge sensation of the healthy subjects was 30mmHg, therefore the subliminal, liminal, and supraliminal pressures were 15mmHg, 30mmHg, and 45mmHg, respectively. The cortical areas represented at subliminal and supraliminal pressures were similar in both groups. However, the volume of cortical activity at parietal lobe and precuneus was lower in constipated subjects at liminal pressure (P<0.003). There was frontal and limbic lobe activation in the normal subjects at urge sensation but not in constipated subjects (p<0.0034). Conclusion: Patient with functional constipation have impaired afferent pathway leading to abnormal urge sensation.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gastroen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofGastroenterologyen_HK
dc.titleDecreased cortical activation during rectal distention in patients with functional constipation with normal rectal complianceen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0016-5085&volume=132&issue=4&spage=A23&epage=&date=2007&atitle=Decreased+cortical+activation+during+rectal+distention+in+patients+with+functional+constipation+with+normal+rectal+compliance.++Digestive+Disease+Week+2007,+Washington+DC,+USA,+May+19-24en_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, AOO: aoochan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHui, WM: hrmehwm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, YC: newgigi21@hotmail.comen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, SK: deanmed@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, BCY: bcywong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, BCY=rp00429en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0016-5085(07)60009-2-
dc.identifier.hkuros131413en_HK
dc.identifier.volume132en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4, Suppl. 2en_HK
dc.identifier.spageA23en_HK
dc.identifier.epageA23-

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