Name Card
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Dr Gibson, Lucas Garrett

Title:
Honorary Assistant Professor
Research Assistant Professor

Contact Information
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Tel:
2299 0674
Office:

Dr Gibson, Lucas Garrett

Title:
Honorary Assistant Professor
Research Assistant Professor

Research Interests:(click to check for cognate researchers)

My URLs:

Also Cited As:
Gibson, L
Gibson, Luke

Professional Qualifications
YearAwarding InstitutionQualification
2001-2005Princeton UniversityB.A. in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
2007-2010University of California, San DiegoM.S. in Biological Sciences
2010-2014National University of SingaporePh.D. in Biological Sciences
Biography

My PhD research focuses on deforestation and forest fragmentation and their impacts on tropical biodiversity. Tropical forests hold up to 50% of the species found on earth, and are being rapidly replaced by fields of rice or soybeans and plantations of rubber or palm oil. In one study, I synthesized over 100 studies around the world to examine the impact of various forms of human disturbance on biodiversity. A key finding was that selectively logged forests sustained relatively high levels of biodiversity, whereas secondary forests were depleted of biodiversity (Gibson et alNature 2011). As deforestation spreads across the tropics, forests increasingly persist as small patches surrounded by inhospitable human-dominated landscapes. These fragments will be depleted of biodiversity over a certain relaxation period until equilibrium is reached. A key question I have examined is how rapidly species disappear from forest fragments. I resurveyed forest islands in Chiew Larn Reservoir in southern Thailand to measure the rate of species loss, and observed the near-complete extinction of native small mammals from fragments 56 hectares or smaller within 25 years. The presence of an invasive rat species probably accelerated species loss, and the presence of similar invasive species in human-modified landscapes suggests that forest fragments may be even more vulnerable to biodiversity loss than previously thought (Gibson et alScience 2013). Combined, my findings suggest that - if we want to preserve the world's greatest bastion of biodiversity - we must reduce deforestation and fragmentation in intact forest expanses and rapidly restore forest connectivity in highly fragmented regions.

 
Honours, Awards & Prizes
AwardeesAward DateHonours / Awards / PrizesCategory
2015-07-01Wang Gungwu Medal & Prize: National University of Singapore
Research Achievement
2015-07-01World Future Foundation Prize in Environmental and Sustainability Research: World Future Foundation
Research Achievement
Media Contact Directory
Area of Expertise:
Area of Expertise (EN)Area of Expertise (ZH)
Tropical forest ecology
Extinction
Conservation biology
Biodiversity
Spoken Languages:
Spoken Language(s) (EN)Spoken Language(s) (ZH)
English英語
Written Languages:
Written Language(s) (EN)Written Language(s) (ZH)
English英文
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