File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Gender difference in HIV-1 RNA viral loads
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleGender difference in HIV-1 RNA viral loads
 
AuthorsDonnelly, CA2
Bartley, LM2
Ghani, AC2
Le Fevre, AM2
Kwong, GP2
Cowling, BJ2
van Sighem, AL1
de Wolf, F2 1
Rode, RA3
Anderson, RM2
 
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
Issue Date2005
 
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HIV
 
CitationHiv Medicine, 2005, v. 6 n. 3, p. 170-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1293.2005.00285.x
 
AbstractObjectives: To test and characterize the dependence of viral load on gender in different countries and racial groups as a function of CD4 T-cell count. Methods: Plasma viral load data were analysed for > 30 000 HIV-infected patients attending clinics in the USA [HIV Insight™ (Cerner Corporation, Vienna, VA, USA) and Plum Data Mining LLC (East Meadow, NY, USA) databases] and the Netherlands (Athena database; HIV Monitoring Foundation, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Log-normal regression models were used to test for an effect of gender on viral load while adjusting for covariates and allowing the effect to depend on CD4 T-cell count. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of conclusions to assumptions regarding viral loads below the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ). Results: After adjusting for covariates, women had (nonsignificantly) lower viral loads than men (HIV Insight™: - 0.053 log 10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, P = 0.202; Athena: - 0.005 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.667; Plum: - 0.072 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.273). However, further investigation revealed that the gender effect d epended on CD4 T-cell count. Women had consistently higher viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were at most 50 cells/μL, and consistently lower viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were greater than 350 cells/μL. These effects were remarkably consistent when estimated independently for the racial groups with sufficient data available in the HIV Insight™ and Plum databases. Conclusions: The consistent relationship between gender-related differences in viral load and CD4 T-cell count demonstrated here explains the diverse findings previously published. © 2005 British HIV Association.
 
ISSN1464-2662
2012 Impact Factor: 3.155
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.272
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1293.2005.00285.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000229374200005
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, CA
 
dc.contributor.authorBartley, LM
 
dc.contributor.authorGhani, AC
 
dc.contributor.authorLe Fevre, AM
 
dc.contributor.authorKwong, GP
 
dc.contributor.authorCowling, BJ
 
dc.contributor.authorvan Sighem, AL
 
dc.contributor.authorde Wolf, F
 
dc.contributor.authorRode, RA
 
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, RM
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:51:25Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:51:25Z
 
dc.date.issued2005
 
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To test and characterize the dependence of viral load on gender in different countries and racial groups as a function of CD4 T-cell count. Methods: Plasma viral load data were analysed for > 30 000 HIV-infected patients attending clinics in the USA [HIV Insight™ (Cerner Corporation, Vienna, VA, USA) and Plum Data Mining LLC (East Meadow, NY, USA) databases] and the Netherlands (Athena database; HIV Monitoring Foundation, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Log-normal regression models were used to test for an effect of gender on viral load while adjusting for covariates and allowing the effect to depend on CD4 T-cell count. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of conclusions to assumptions regarding viral loads below the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ). Results: After adjusting for covariates, women had (nonsignificantly) lower viral loads than men (HIV Insight™: - 0.053 log 10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, P = 0.202; Athena: - 0.005 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.667; Plum: - 0.072 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.273). However, further investigation revealed that the gender effect d epended on CD4 T-cell count. Women had consistently higher viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were at most 50 cells/μL, and consistently lower viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were greater than 350 cells/μL. These effects were remarkably consistent when estimated independently for the racial groups with sufficient data available in the HIV Insight™ and Plum databases. Conclusions: The consistent relationship between gender-related differences in viral load and CD4 T-cell count demonstrated here explains the diverse findings previously published. © 2005 British HIV Association.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationHiv Medicine, 2005, v. 6 n. 3, p. 170-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1293.2005.00285.x
 
dc.identifier.citeulike186223
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-1293.2005.00285.x
 
dc.identifier.epage178
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229374200005
 
dc.identifier.issn1464-2662
2012 Impact Factor: 3.155
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.272
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid15876283
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-21144446700
 
dc.identifier.spage170
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92603
 
dc.identifier.volume6
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HIV
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofHIV Medicine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshCD4 Lymphocyte Count
 
dc.subject.meshData Collection
 
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factual
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHIV Infections - immunology - virology
 
dc.subject.meshHIV-1
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis
 
dc.subject.meshSex Distribution
 
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric
 
dc.subject.meshUnited States
 
dc.subject.meshViral Load
 
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
 
dc.titleGender difference in HIV-1 RNA viral loads
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Donnelly, CA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Bartley, LM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ghani, AC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Le Fevre, AM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Kwong, GP</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Cowling, BJ</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>van Sighem, AL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>de Wolf, F</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Rode, RA</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Anderson, RM</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2010-09-17T10:51:25Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2010-09-17T10:51:25Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2005</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Hiv Medicine, 2005, v. 6 n. 3, p. 170-178</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1464-2662</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/92603</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Objectives: To test and characterize the dependence of viral load on gender in different countries and racial groups as a function of CD4 T-cell count. Methods: Plasma viral load data were analysed for &gt; 30 000 HIV-infected patients attending clinics in the USA [HIV Insight&#8482; (Cerner Corporation, Vienna, VA, USA) and Plum Data Mining LLC (East Meadow, NY, USA) databases] and the Netherlands (Athena database; HIV Monitoring Foundation, Amsterdam, Netherlands). Log-normal regression models were used to test for an effect of gender on viral load while adjusting for covariates and allowing the effect to depend on CD4 T-cell count. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of conclusions to assumptions regarding viral loads below the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ). Results: After adjusting for covariates, women had (nonsignificantly) lower viral loads than men (HIV Insight&#8482;: - 0.053 log 10 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL, P = 0.202; Athena: - 0.005 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.667; Plum: - 0.072 log 10 copies/mL, P = 0.273). However, further investigation revealed that the gender effect d epended on CD4 T-cell count. Women had consistently higher viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were at most 50 cells/&#956;L, and consistently lower viral loads than men when CD4 T-cell counts were greater than 350 cells/&#956;L. These effects were remarkably consistent when estimated independently for the racial groups with sufficient data available in the HIV Insight&#8482; and Plum databases. Conclusions: The consistent relationship between gender-related differences in viral load and CD4 T-cell count demonstrated here explains the diverse findings previously published. &#169; 2005 British HIV Association.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/HIV</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>HIV Medicine</relation.ispartof>
<subject>Chemicals And Cas Registry Numbers</subject>
<subject.mesh>Adult</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>CD4 Lymphocyte Count</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Data Collection</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Databases, Factual</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Female</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>HIV Infections - immunology - virology</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>HIV-1</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Humans</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Regression Analysis</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Sex Distribution</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Statistics, Nonparametric</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>United States</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Viral Load</subject.mesh>
<title>Gender difference in HIV-1 RNA viral loads</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1111/j.1468-1293.2005.00285.x</identifier.doi>
<identifier.pmid>15876283</identifier.pmid>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-21144446700</identifier.scopus>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-21144446700&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>6</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>3</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>170</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>178</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000229374200005</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
<identifier.citeulike>186223</identifier.citeulike>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam
  2. Imperial College London
  3. Abbott Laboratories