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Article: Temporal relationship between air pollutants and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kong

TitleTemporal relationship between air pollutants and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsChemicals And Cas Registry Numbers
Issue Date2007
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Thorax, 2007, v. 62 n. 9, p. 779-784 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: To assess any relationship between the levels of ambient air pollutants and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Hong Kong. Methods: A retrospective ecological study was undertaken. Data of daily emergency hospital admissions to 15 major hospitals in Hong Kong for COPD and indices of air pollutants (sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10) and 2.5 μm (PM 2.5)) and meteorological variables from January 2000 to December 2004 were obtained from several government departments. Analysis was performed using generalised additive models with Poisson distribution, adjusted for the effects of time trend, season, other cyclical factors, temperature and humidity. Autocorrelation and overdispersion were corrected. Results: Significant associations were found between hospital admissions for COPD with all five air pollutants. Relative risks for admission for every 10 μg/m3 increase in SO2, NO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5 were 1.007, 1.026, 1.034, 1.024 and 1.031, respectively, at a lag day ranging from lag 0 to cumulative lag 0-5. In a multipollutant model, O3, SO2 and PM2.5 were significantly associated with increased admissions for COPD. SO2, NO2 and O 3 had a greater effect on COPD admissions in the cold season (December to March) than during the warm season. Conclusion: Ambient concentrations of air pollutants have an adverse effect on hospital admissions for COPD in Hong Kong, especially during the winter season. This might be due to indoor exposure to outdoor pollution through open windows as central heating is not required in the mild winter. Measures to improve air quality are urgently needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92581
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.121
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.650
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, FWSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTze, WWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, DPSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTung, AHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, CKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHui, DSCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:50:44Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:50:44Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThorax, 2007, v. 62 n. 9, p. 779-784en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0040-6376en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/92581-
dc.description.abstractAims: To assess any relationship between the levels of ambient air pollutants and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Hong Kong. Methods: A retrospective ecological study was undertaken. Data of daily emergency hospital admissions to 15 major hospitals in Hong Kong for COPD and indices of air pollutants (sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), particulates with an aerodynamic diameter of <10 μm (PM10) and 2.5 μm (PM 2.5)) and meteorological variables from January 2000 to December 2004 were obtained from several government departments. Analysis was performed using generalised additive models with Poisson distribution, adjusted for the effects of time trend, season, other cyclical factors, temperature and humidity. Autocorrelation and overdispersion were corrected. Results: Significant associations were found between hospital admissions for COPD with all five air pollutants. Relative risks for admission for every 10 μg/m3 increase in SO2, NO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5 were 1.007, 1.026, 1.034, 1.024 and 1.031, respectively, at a lag day ranging from lag 0 to cumulative lag 0-5. In a multipollutant model, O3, SO2 and PM2.5 were significantly associated with increased admissions for COPD. SO2, NO2 and O 3 had a greater effect on COPD admissions in the cold season (December to March) than during the warm season. Conclusion: Ambient concentrations of air pollutants have an adverse effect on hospital admissions for COPD in Hong Kong, especially during the winter season. This might be due to indoor exposure to outdoor pollution through open windows as central heating is not required in the mild winter. Measures to improve air quality are urgently needed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://thorax.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofThoraxen_HK
dc.subjectChemicals And Cas Registry Numbersen_HK
dc.titleTemporal relationship between air pollutants and hospital admissions for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTam, W: wwstam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTam, W=rp01378en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/thx.2006.076166en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17311838-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2117326-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35549008544en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35549008544&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume62en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage779en_HK
dc.identifier.epage784en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249087500008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, FWS=7103224911en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, W=9740867000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTze, WW=8333472800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, DPS=14019025300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTung, AH=15123254000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, CKW=7403086390en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, DSC=7101862411en_HK

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