File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Crystallization of silver stearate from sodium stearate dispersions

TitleCrystallization of silver stearate from sodium stearate dispersions
Authors
KeywordsPaperchem Variable: Cryogenics
Crystallization
Dispersions
Particle Size
Precipitation
Silver Compounds
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/langmuir
Citation
Langmuir, 2004, v. 20 n. 21, p. 9069-9074 How to Cite?
AbstractSilver carboxylates, the common silver source used for photothermographic imaging materials, are normally obtained from the reaction between sodium soap (e.g., sodium stearate) and silver nitrate. They form platelet-like crystals with a lamellar structure in water at room temperature. Light microscopy investigations reveal that the formation of silver stearate (AgSt) crystals follows a diffusion-controlled mechanism. The reaction between the sodium soap and silver nitrate preferentially occurs in solution rather than on the soap fiber solid interface. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, together with an on-the-grid reaction technique, provides a useful tool to directly image silver stearate microstructures at the initial stages of AgSt precipitation. The AgSt reaction product first forms particles about 5 nm in size, which is similar to the d-spacing of final AgSt crystals. Those particles aggregate to produce larger and loosely packed embryonic crystals, the precursors to the ultimate silver stearate crystals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90891
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.993
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.750
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLin, Ben_HK
dc.contributor.authorDong, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWhitcomb, DRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorMcCormick, AVen_HK
dc.contributor.authorDavis, HTen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-17T10:09:56Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-17T10:09:56Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationLangmuir, 2004, v. 20 n. 21, p. 9069-9074en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0743-7463en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/90891-
dc.description.abstractSilver carboxylates, the common silver source used for photothermographic imaging materials, are normally obtained from the reaction between sodium soap (e.g., sodium stearate) and silver nitrate. They form platelet-like crystals with a lamellar structure in water at room temperature. Light microscopy investigations reveal that the formation of silver stearate (AgSt) crystals follows a diffusion-controlled mechanism. The reaction between the sodium soap and silver nitrate preferentially occurs in solution rather than on the soap fiber solid interface. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, together with an on-the-grid reaction technique, provides a useful tool to directly image silver stearate microstructures at the initial stages of AgSt precipitation. The AgSt reaction product first forms particles about 5 nm in size, which is similar to the d-spacing of final AgSt crystals. Those particles aggregate to produce larger and loosely packed embryonic crystals, the precursors to the ultimate silver stearate crystals.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/langmuiren_HK
dc.relation.ispartofLangmuiren_HK
dc.subjectPaperchem Variable: Cryogenicsen_HK
dc.subjectCrystallizationen_HK
dc.subjectDispersionsen_HK
dc.subjectParticle Sizeen_HK
dc.subjectPrecipitationen_HK
dc.subjectSilver Compoundsen_HK
dc.titleCrystallization of silver stearate from sodium stearate dispersionsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLin, B:blin@hku.hken_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/la048793gen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15461488-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-6444220133en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-6444220133&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue21en_HK
dc.identifier.spage9069en_HK
dc.identifier.epage9074en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224391600020-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats