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Article: Emotional control in Chinese female cancer survivors

TitleEmotional control in Chinese female cancer survivors
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807
Citation
Psycho-Oncology, 2004, v. 13 n. 11, p. 808-817 How to Cite?
AbstractChinese persons are not known as strong in expressing emotions, especially negative ones. However, being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment can be an emotionally traumatic experience and cancer patients are supposed to have a stronger need to express these negative feelings. The control of expression of negative emotions such as anger, anxiety and depression in Chinese female cancer survivors (n = 139) was examined in the present study using the Chinese version of the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS). The reliability, internal consistency and validity of the Chinese CECS were comparable to the original English scale. Correlation analyses suggested that cancer survivors with higher emotional control tended to have higher stress, anxiety and depression levels and to adopt negative coping with cancer. Regression analysis showed that emotional control would positively predict stress level even after the effect of depressed mood was under control. Further investigations are suggested in order to elucidate the causal relationships and specific cultural factors affecting emotional control in Chinese cancer survivors and, most importantly, its effect on health outcomes. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88108
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.256
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.904
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, RTHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, CLWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, SMYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:38:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:38:53Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPsycho-Oncology, 2004, v. 13 n. 11, p. 808-817en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1057-9249en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/88108-
dc.description.abstractChinese persons are not known as strong in expressing emotions, especially negative ones. However, being diagnosed with cancer and going through treatment can be an emotionally traumatic experience and cancer patients are supposed to have a stronger need to express these negative feelings. The control of expression of negative emotions such as anger, anxiety and depression in Chinese female cancer survivors (n = 139) was examined in the present study using the Chinese version of the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS). The reliability, internal consistency and validity of the Chinese CECS were comparable to the original English scale. Correlation analyses suggested that cancer survivors with higher emotional control tended to have higher stress, anxiety and depression levels and to adopt negative coping with cancer. Regression analysis showed that emotional control would positively predict stress level even after the effect of depressed mood was under control. Further investigations are suggested in order to elucidate the causal relationships and specific cultural factors affecting emotional control in Chinese cancer survivors and, most importantly, its effect on health outcomes. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5807en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPsycho-Oncologyen_HK
dc.rightsPsycho-Oncology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.titleEmotional control in Chinese female cancer survivorsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1057-9249&volume=13&issue=11&spage=808&epage=817&date=2004&atitle=Emotional+control+in+Chinese+female+cancer+survivorsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, RTH: tinho@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, CLW: cecichan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, SMY: munyin@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, RTH=rp00497en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, CLW=rp00579en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SMY=rp00554en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.799en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15386636-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-9244231188en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros138260en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-9244231188&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage808en_HK
dc.identifier.epage817en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000225348000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, RTH=8620896500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, CLW=35274549700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, SMY=25722730500en_HK

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