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Article: Effects of ambient air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory health of non-smoking women in Hong Kong

TitleEffects of ambient air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory health of non-smoking women in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Epidemiology, 1999, v. 28 n. 5, p. 859-864 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Two-thirds of complaints received by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in 1988 were related to poor air quality. In July 1990 legislation was implemented to reduce fuel sulphur levels. The intervention led to a reduction in respiratory symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness of primary school children. The objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in respiratory health between non-smoking women living in the more polluted district (Kwai Tsing) and those living in the less polluted district (Southern); to assess the impact of the government air quality intervention; and to study the effect of environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory health in non-smoking women in both districts. Method. A total of 3405 non-smoking women, aged 36.5 years (standard deviation = 3.0), from two districts with good and poor air quality respectively before the intervention were followed yearly from 1989 to 1991. Binary latent variable modelling was used to summarize the six respiratory symptoms and to estimate the effects of risk factors. Results. In 1989, living in the polluted district was associated with poor respiratory health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.11-2.17, P < 0.01). After the intervention, in the polluted district only, sulphur dioxide levels fell by up to 80% and sulphate concentrations in respirable particulates by 38%. Between 1989 and 1990-1991, there was no significantly greater decline (P > 0.241) in the more polluted compared with the less polluted district for poor respiratory health. In 1989, the effects on poor respiratory health for exposure to two or more categories of smokers relative to none in the home (OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.15-2.83, P < 0.01) were higher but not significantly than those for living in polluted relative to less polluted district (95% CI of the two effects overlapping each other). Conclusions. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and outdoor air pollution had independent adverse effects on respiratory health of non-smoking women and improvement in air quality had produced some but non-significant benefits.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86824
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHu, ZGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:21:46Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:21:46Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 1999, v. 28 n. 5, p. 859-864en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86824-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Two-thirds of complaints received by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in 1988 were related to poor air quality. In July 1990 legislation was implemented to reduce fuel sulphur levels. The intervention led to a reduction in respiratory symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness of primary school children. The objectives of this study were to investigate the differences in respiratory health between non-smoking women living in the more polluted district (Kwai Tsing) and those living in the less polluted district (Southern); to assess the impact of the government air quality intervention; and to study the effect of environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory health in non-smoking women in both districts. Method. A total of 3405 non-smoking women, aged 36.5 years (standard deviation = 3.0), from two districts with good and poor air quality respectively before the intervention were followed yearly from 1989 to 1991. Binary latent variable modelling was used to summarize the six respiratory symptoms and to estimate the effects of risk factors. Results. In 1989, living in the polluted district was associated with poor respiratory health (odds ratio [OR] = 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.11-2.17, P < 0.01). After the intervention, in the polluted district only, sulphur dioxide levels fell by up to 80% and sulphate concentrations in respirable particulates by 38%. Between 1989 and 1990-1991, there was no significantly greater decline (P > 0.241) in the more polluted compared with the less polluted district for poor respiratory health. In 1989, the effects on poor respiratory health for exposure to two or more categories of smokers relative to none in the home (OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 1.15-2.83, P < 0.01) were higher but not significantly than those for living in polluted relative to less polluted district (95% CI of the two effects overlapping each other). Conclusions. Environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) and outdoor air pollution had independent adverse effects on respiratory health of non-smoking women and improvement in air quality had produced some but non-significant benefits.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAge Distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - adverse effects - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfidence Intervalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoringen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratioen_HK
dc.subject.meshPopulation Surveillanceen_HK
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Resultsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSampling Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshTobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - analysisen_HK
dc.subject.meshWomen's Healthen_HK
dc.titleEffects of ambient air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke on respiratory health of non-smoking women in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-5771&volume=28&spage=859&epage=864&date=1999&atitle=Effects+of+ambient+air+pollution+and+environmental+tobacco+smoke+on+respiratory+health+of+non-smoking+women+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ije/28.5.859en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10597983-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032697572en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros47299en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032697572&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume28en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage859en_HK
dc.identifier.epage864en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000083827000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, ZG=7404211146en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeters, J=24784601400en_HK

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