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Article: Short-term association between sulfur dioxide and daily mortality: The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) study

TitleShort-term association between sulfur dioxide and daily mortality: The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) study
Authors
KeywordsAir pollution
Mortality
Sulfur dioxide
Time-series
Issue Date2010
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envres
Citation
Environmental Research, 2010, v. 110 n. 3, p. 258-264 How to Cite?
AbstractSulfur dioxide (SO2) has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity, but only few studies were conducted in Asian countries. Previous studies suggest that SO2 may have adverse health effects independent of other pollutants. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project, the short-term associations between ambient sulfur dioxide (SO2) and daily mortality were examined in Bangkok, Thailand, and three Chinese cities: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates. Effect estimates were obtained for each city and then for the cities combined. The impact of alternative model specifications, such as lag structure of pollutants and degree of freedom (df) for time trend, on the estimated effects of SO2 were also examined. In both individual-city and combined analysis, significant effects of SO2 on total non-accidental and cardiopulmonary mortality were observed. An increase of 10 μg/m3 of 2-day moving average concentrations of SO2 corresponded to 1.00% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.24], 1.09% (95% CI, 0.71-1.47), and 1.47% (95% CI, 0.85-2.08) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, in the combined analysis. Sensitivity analyzes suggested that these findings were generally insensitive to alternative model specifications. After adjustment for PM10 or O3, the effect of SO2 remained significant in three Chinese cities. However, adjustment for NO2 diminished the associations and rendered them statistically insignificant in all four cities. In conclusion, ambient SO2 concentration was associated with daily mortality in these four Asian cities. These associations may be attributable to SO2 serving as a surrogate of other substances. Our findings suggest that the role of outdoor exposure to SO2 should be investigated further in this region. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86547
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.088
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.452
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Health Effects Institute (HEI)
US Environmental Protection AgencyR82811201
China Ministry of Environmental Protection200809109
National Natural Science Foundation of China30800892
Shanghai Pu Jiang Program09PJ1401700
Funding Information:

Research described in this article was conducted under contract to the Health Effects Institute (HEI), an organization jointly funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Assistance Agreement R82811201) and automobile manufacturers. The contents of this article do not necessarily reflect the views of HEI, nor do they necessarily reflect the views and policies of the US EPA or of motor vehicle and engine manufacturers. Haidong Kan was supported by the Gong-Yi Program of China Ministry of Environmental Protection (200809109), National Natural Science Foundation of China (30800892), and Shanghai Pu Jiang Program (09PJ1401700).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKan, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorVichitVadakan, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQian, Zen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPAPA Project Teams-
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:18:23Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:18:23Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Research, 2010, v. 110 n. 3, p. 258-264en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0013-9351en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86547-
dc.description.abstractSulfur dioxide (SO2) has been associated with increased mortality and morbidity, but only few studies were conducted in Asian countries. Previous studies suggest that SO2 may have adverse health effects independent of other pollutants. In the Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) project, the short-term associations between ambient sulfur dioxide (SO2) and daily mortality were examined in Bangkok, Thailand, and three Chinese cities: Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Wuhan. Poisson regression models incorporating natural spline smoothing functions were used to adjust for seasonality and other time-varying covariates. Effect estimates were obtained for each city and then for the cities combined. The impact of alternative model specifications, such as lag structure of pollutants and degree of freedom (df) for time trend, on the estimated effects of SO2 were also examined. In both individual-city and combined analysis, significant effects of SO2 on total non-accidental and cardiopulmonary mortality were observed. An increase of 10 μg/m3 of 2-day moving average concentrations of SO2 corresponded to 1.00% [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.75-1.24], 1.09% (95% CI, 0.71-1.47), and 1.47% (95% CI, 0.85-2.08) increase of total, cardiovascular and respiratory mortality, respectively, in the combined analysis. Sensitivity analyzes suggested that these findings were generally insensitive to alternative model specifications. After adjustment for PM10 or O3, the effect of SO2 remained significant in three Chinese cities. However, adjustment for NO2 diminished the associations and rendered them statistically insignificant in all four cities. In conclusion, ambient SO2 concentration was associated with daily mortality in these four Asian cities. These associations may be attributable to SO2 serving as a surrogate of other substances. Our findings suggest that the role of outdoor exposure to SO2 should be investigated further in this region. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envresen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Researchen_HK
dc.subjectAir pollutionen_HK
dc.subjectMortalityen_HK
dc.subjectSulfur dioxideen_HK
dc.subjectTime-seriesen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - analysis-
dc.subject.meshAir Pollution - adverse effects - analysis-
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Exposure - adverse effects-
dc.subject.meshMortality - trends-
dc.subject.meshSulfur Dioxide - analysis-
dc.titleShort-term association between sulfur dioxide and daily mortality: The Public Health and Air Pollution in Asia (PAPA) studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0013-9351&volume=110&issue=3&spage=258&epage=64&date=2010&atitle=Short-term+association+between+sulfur+dioxide+and+daily+mortality:+The+Public+Health+and+Air+Pollution+in+Asia+(PAPA)+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2010.01.006en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid20122685-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-77649272936en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros169576en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-77649272936&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume110en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage258en_HK
dc.identifier.epage264en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275943300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKan, H=7101602991en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVichitVadakan, N=6507000428en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, Z=35727771800en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike6832077-

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