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Article: China's WTO accession, state enterprise reform, and spatial economic restructuring

TitleChina's WTO accession, state enterprise reform, and spatial economic restructuring
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.com/journal/jid
Citation
Journal Of International Development, 2002, v. 14 n. 4, p. 413-433 How to Cite?
AbstractChina's accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) promises to have profound effects on the development of the nation's economy and on nationwide enterprise reorganization. This paper attempts to address the relationship between China's WTO accession and state enterprise reforms, and their impacts on the performance of China's spatial economy, including the possible rise and fall of several large national financial centres, such as Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. It is argued that China's new international ties will enhance current enterprise reforms and promote changes in the existing pattern of enterprise organization, with enterprise mergers, acquisitions, takeover activity and the formation of large multinational corporations (MNCs) becoming dominant trends within China's industrial development. Alongside these changes, some economic sectors, such as information technology (IT) and advanced professional services are predicted to become concentrated in several national information 'heartlands,' each having its own well-developed information infrastructure and other comparative advantages over traditional industrial centers. Meanwhile traditional industrial enterprises, while continuing to rely upon their pre-assigned resource priorities, will certainly face fierce international competition in the turbulent global market. The spatial shift of production and trade undoubtedly requires that Chinese enterprises, especially those that are state-owned, reorganize their production-trade systems according to the global 'rules of the game'. All of these changes, due to take effect imminently with China's WTO accession, will fundamentally restructure China's spatial economic landscape, including the creation of a new information heartland and hinterland that will in turn determine the life or death of the country's national financial centres. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86115
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.659
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.505
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, SXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTong, CSPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorQiao, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:13:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:13:04Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of International Development, 2002, v. 14 n. 4, p. 413-433en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-1748en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/86115-
dc.description.abstractChina's accession to the World Trade Organization (WTO) promises to have profound effects on the development of the nation's economy and on nationwide enterprise reorganization. This paper attempts to address the relationship between China's WTO accession and state enterprise reforms, and their impacts on the performance of China's spatial economy, including the possible rise and fall of several large national financial centres, such as Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. It is argued that China's new international ties will enhance current enterprise reforms and promote changes in the existing pattern of enterprise organization, with enterprise mergers, acquisitions, takeover activity and the formation of large multinational corporations (MNCs) becoming dominant trends within China's industrial development. Alongside these changes, some economic sectors, such as information technology (IT) and advanced professional services are predicted to become concentrated in several national information 'heartlands,' each having its own well-developed information infrastructure and other comparative advantages over traditional industrial centers. Meanwhile traditional industrial enterprises, while continuing to rely upon their pre-assigned resource priorities, will certainly face fierce international competition in the turbulent global market. The spatial shift of production and trade undoubtedly requires that Chinese enterprises, especially those that are state-owned, reorganize their production-trade systems according to the global 'rules of the game'. All of these changes, due to take effect imminently with China's WTO accession, will fundamentally restructure China's spatial economic landscape, including the creation of a new information heartland and hinterland that will in turn determine the life or death of the country's national financial centres. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.interscience.com/journal/jiden_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of International Developmenten_HK
dc.rightsJournal of International Development. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.titleChina's WTO accession, state enterprise reform, and spatial economic restructuringen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0954-1748&volume=14&issue=4&spage=413&epage=433&date=2002&atitle=China%27s+WTO+Accession,+State+Enterprise+Reform,+and+Spatial+Economic+Restructuringen_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhao, SX:sxzhao@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, SX=rp00597en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jid.859en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036269011en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros74358en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036269011&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume14en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage413en_HK
dc.identifier.epage433en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, SX=7403577707en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTong, CSP=7202715070en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiao, J=7103301258en_HK

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