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Article: Quality management and job satisfaction: an empirical study

TitleQuality management and job satisfaction: an empirical study
Authors
KeywordsCorporate culture
Employee attitudes
Human resource management
Job promotion
Job satisfaction
Issue Date1995
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ijqrm.htm
Citation
International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 1995, v. 12 n. 4, p. 72-78 How to Cite?
AbstractReports on the results of a survey of 220 front‐line supervisors in Hong Kong using the job descriptive index (JDI) to investigate the perceived impact of total quality management (TQM) programmes on job satisfaction. Shows that the respondents were much less satisfied with the work dimension than with other JDI dimensions such as supervision and co‐workers. TQM programmes seemed to have no impact on pay and promotion. The respondents perceived that the TQM programmes had led to a variety of changes which made their jobs more demanding, requiring greater individual skill and accuracy, but did not make their jobs more interesting and important. Discusses significance of these findings in the context of the need to provide employee satisfaction in total quality management.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85954
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.544

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, SSKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:11:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:11:08Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 1995, v. 12 n. 4, p. 72-78en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0265-671Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/85954-
dc.description.abstractReports on the results of a survey of 220 front‐line supervisors in Hong Kong using the job descriptive index (JDI) to investigate the perceived impact of total quality management (TQM) programmes on job satisfaction. Shows that the respondents were much less satisfied with the work dimension than with other JDI dimensions such as supervision and co‐workers. TQM programmes seemed to have no impact on pay and promotion. The respondents perceived that the TQM programmes had led to a variety of changes which made their jobs more demanding, requiring greater individual skill and accuracy, but did not make their jobs more interesting and important. Discusses significance of these findings in the context of the need to provide employee satisfaction in total quality management.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/ijqrm.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Quality & Reliability Managementen_HK
dc.subjectCorporate culture-
dc.subjectEmployee attitudes-
dc.subjectHuman resource management-
dc.subjectJob promotion-
dc.subjectJob satisfaction-
dc.titleQuality management and job satisfaction: an empirical studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0265-671X&volume=12&issue=4&spage=72&epage=78&date=1995&atitle=Quality+management+and+job+satisfaction:+an+empirical+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, SSK: simonlam@business.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, SSK=rp01071en_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02656719510087337-
dc.identifier.hkuros14400en_HK
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage72-
dc.identifier.epage78-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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