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Article: Electroacupuncture for primary insomnia: A randomized controlled trial

TitleElectroacupuncture for primary insomnia: A randomized controlled trial
Authors
KeywordsAcupuncture
Electroacupuncture
Insomnia
Randomized controlled trial
Sleep
Traditional Chinese medicine
Issue Date2009
PublisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.org
Citation
Sleep, 2009, v. 32 n. 8, p. 1039-1047 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Objectives: To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for the treatment of primary insomnia. Design: Randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group. Setting: A university-based sleep clinic. Participants: Community sample of 60 Chinese adult volunteers who report having insomnia 3 or more nights per week, whose symptoms meet the DSM-IV criteria for primary insomnia for at least 3 months, and who have an Insomnia Severity Index total score of at least 15. Participants were screened with polysomnography and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV prior to randomization. Intervention: Electroacupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN3), Baihui (GV20), bilateral ear Shenmen, Sishencong (EX-HN1), and Anmian (EX) 3 times per week for 3 weeks or placebo acupuncture using Streitberger needles at the same points. Measurements and Results: Self-reported questionnaires, 1-week sleep diaries, and 3-day actigraphy were collected at baseline and 1 week after treatment. The Insomnia Severity Index was used as the primary outcome measure. Both groups showed significant improvement compared with the pretreatment baseline. One-way analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline scores showed that there were significantly greater improvements in sleep efficiency by sleep diary and actigraphy in the electroacupuncture group. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in the Insomnia Severity Index and other outcome measures. The proportions of subjects having less than 30 minutes of wake after sleep onset and a sleep efficiency of at least 85% at the posttreatment visit were significantly higher in the electroacupuncture group. All adverse events were mild in severity. Conclusion: We found a slight advantage of electroacupuncture over placebo acupuncture in the short-term treatment of primary insomnia. Because of some limitations of the current study, further studies are necessary to verify the effectiveness of acupuncture for insomnia.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81676
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.793
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.606
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, SPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYap, TGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, ACKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSleep, 2009, v. 32 n. 8, p. 1039-1047en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0161-8105en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81676-
dc.description.abstractStudy Objectives: To evaluate the short-term efficacy and safety of electroacupuncture for the treatment of primary insomnia. Design: Randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group. Setting: A university-based sleep clinic. Participants: Community sample of 60 Chinese adult volunteers who report having insomnia 3 or more nights per week, whose symptoms meet the DSM-IV criteria for primary insomnia for at least 3 months, and who have an Insomnia Severity Index total score of at least 15. Participants were screened with polysomnography and the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV prior to randomization. Intervention: Electroacupuncture at Yintang (EX-HN3), Baihui (GV20), bilateral ear Shenmen, Sishencong (EX-HN1), and Anmian (EX) 3 times per week for 3 weeks or placebo acupuncture using Streitberger needles at the same points. Measurements and Results: Self-reported questionnaires, 1-week sleep diaries, and 3-day actigraphy were collected at baseline and 1 week after treatment. The Insomnia Severity Index was used as the primary outcome measure. Both groups showed significant improvement compared with the pretreatment baseline. One-way analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline scores showed that there were significantly greater improvements in sleep efficiency by sleep diary and actigraphy in the electroacupuncture group. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in the Insomnia Severity Index and other outcome measures. The proportions of subjects having less than 30 minutes of wake after sleep onset and a sleep efficiency of at least 85% at the posttreatment visit were significantly higher in the electroacupuncture group. All adverse events were mild in severity. Conclusion: We found a slight advantage of electroacupuncture over placebo acupuncture in the short-term treatment of primary insomnia. Because of some limitations of the current study, further studies are necessary to verify the effectiveness of acupuncture for insomnia.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journalsleep.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSleepen_HK
dc.subjectAcupunctureen_HK
dc.subjectElectroacupunctureen_HK
dc.subjectInsomniaen_HK
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trialen_HK
dc.subjectSleepen_HK
dc.subjectTraditional Chinese medicineen_HK
dc.titleElectroacupuncture for primary insomnia: A randomized controlled trialen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0161-8105&volume=32 &issue=8&spage=1039&epage=1047&date=2009&atitle=Electroacupuncture+for+Primary+Insomnia:+A+Randomized+Controlled+Trialen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLaw, ACK: acklaw@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, ACK=rp00262en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid19725255-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC2717194-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349107709en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros163932en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349107709&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume32en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1039en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1047en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268557600011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, WF=24345897100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, SP=8056720600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYap, TG=35197641600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, ACK=26323772800en_HK

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