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Article: A tale of two cities: Effects of air pollution on hospital admissions in Hong Kong and London compared

TitleA tale of two cities: Effects of air pollution on hospital admissions in Hong Kong and London compared
Authors
KeywordsAir pollution
Cardiac and respiratory hospital admissions
Daily time-series
Hong Kong
London
Issue Date2002
PublisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/
Citation
Environmental Health Perspectives, 2002, v. 110 n. 1, p. 67-77 How to Cite?
AbstractThe causal interpretation of reported associations between daily air pollution and daily admissions requires consideration of residual confounding, correlation between pollutants, and effect modification. If results obtained in Hong Kong and London-which differ in climate, lifestyle, and many other respects-were similar, a causal association would be supported. We used identical statistical methods for the analysis in each city. Associations between daily admissions and pollutant levels were estimated using Poisson regression. Nonparametric smoothing methods were used to model seasonality and the nonlinear dependence of admissions on temperature, humidity, and influenza admissions. For respiratory admissions (≥ 65 years of age), significant positive associations were observed with particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone in both cities. These associations tended to be stronger at shorter lags in Hong Kong and at longer lags in London. Associations were stronger in the cool season in Hong Kong and in the warm season in London, periods during which levels of humidity are at their lowest in each city. For cardiac admissions (all ages) in both cities, significant positive associations were observed for PM10, NO2, and SO2 with similar lag patterns. Associations tended to be stronger in the cool season. The associations with NO2 and SO2 were the most robust in two-pollutant models. Patterns of association for pollutants with ischemic heart disease were similar in the two cities. The associations between O3 and cardiac admissions were negative in London but positive in Hong Kong. We conclude that air pollution has remarkably similar associations with daily cardiorespiratory admissions in both cities, in spite of considerable differences between cities in social, lifestyle, and environmental factors. The results strengthen the argument that air pollution causes detrimental short-term health effects.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49373
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.443
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.529
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, RWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorRoss Anderson, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorStefan, Maen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChau, PYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2008-06-12T06:40:44Z-
dc.date.available2008-06-12T06:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Health Perspectives, 2002, v. 110 n. 1, p. 67-77en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0091-6765en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/49373-
dc.description.abstractThe causal interpretation of reported associations between daily air pollution and daily admissions requires consideration of residual confounding, correlation between pollutants, and effect modification. If results obtained in Hong Kong and London-which differ in climate, lifestyle, and many other respects-were similar, a causal association would be supported. We used identical statistical methods for the analysis in each city. Associations between daily admissions and pollutant levels were estimated using Poisson regression. Nonparametric smoothing methods were used to model seasonality and the nonlinear dependence of admissions on temperature, humidity, and influenza admissions. For respiratory admissions (≥ 65 years of age), significant positive associations were observed with particulate matter < 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone in both cities. These associations tended to be stronger at shorter lags in Hong Kong and at longer lags in London. Associations were stronger in the cool season in Hong Kong and in the warm season in London, periods during which levels of humidity are at their lowest in each city. For cardiac admissions (all ages) in both cities, significant positive associations were observed for PM10, NO2, and SO2 with similar lag patterns. Associations tended to be stronger in the cool season. The associations with NO2 and SO2 were the most robust in two-pollutant models. Patterns of association for pollutants with ischemic heart disease were similar in the two cities. The associations between O3 and cardiac admissions were negative in London but positive in Hong Kong. We conclude that air pollution has remarkably similar associations with daily cardiorespiratory admissions in both cities, in spite of considerable differences between cities in social, lifestyle, and environmental factors. The results strengthen the argument that air pollution causes detrimental short-term health effects.en_HK
dc.format.extent388 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypetext/html-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherUS Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Health Perspectivesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectAir pollutionen_HK
dc.subjectCardiac and respiratory hospital admissionsen_HK
dc.subjectDaily time-seriesen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectLondonen_HK
dc.subject.meshAir Pollutants - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshLung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPatient Admission - statistics & numerical dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshConfounding Factors (Epidemiology)en_HK
dc.titleA tale of two cities: Effects of air pollution on hospital admissions in Hong Kong and London compareden_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0091-6765&volume=110&issue=1&spage=67&epage=77&date=2002&atitle=A+tale+of+two+cities:+effects+of+air+pollution+on+hospital+admissions+in+Hong+Kong+and+London+compareden_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, CM:hrmrwcm@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CM=rp00338en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11781167-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1240695en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036153843en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros65214-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036153843&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume110en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage67en_HK
dc.identifier.epage77en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173864000028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=7404954904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAtkinson, RW=7402372928en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoss Anderson, H=22735514200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStefan, Ma=17341623100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, PYK=34876162600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK

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