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Article: Improving decision-making for population health in nonhealth sectors in urban environments: the example of the transportation sector in three megacities—the 3-D commission

TitleImproving decision-making for population health in nonhealth sectors in urban environments: the example of the transportation sector in three megacities—the 3-D commission
Authors
KeywordsBRT
HiAP
Health-in-all-policies
Health policy
Transportation sector
Megacities
Social determinants of health
SDoH
Issue Date2021
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.springer.com/journal/11524
Citation
Journal of Urban Health, 2021, v. 98 n. suppl. 1, p. 60-68 How to Cite?
AbstractNoncommunicable diseases (NCDs) represent a significant global public health burden. As more countries experience both epidemiologic transition and increasing urbanization, it is clear that we need approaches to mitigate the growing burden of NCDs. Large and growing urban environments play an important role in shaping risk factors that influence NCDs, pointing to the ineluctable need to engage sectors beyond the health sector in these settings if we are to improve health. By way of one example, the transportation sector plays a critical role in building and sustaining health outcomes in urban environments in general and in megacities in particular. We conducted a qualitative comparative case study design. We compared Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) policies in 3 megacities—Lagos (Africa), Bogotá (South America), and Beijing (Asia). We examined the extent to which data on the social determinants of health, equity considerations, and multisectoral approaches were incorporated into local politics and the decision-making processes surrounding BRT. We found that all three megacities paid inadequate attention to health in their agenda-setting, despite having considerable healthy transportation policies in principle. BRT system policies have the opportunity to improve lifestyle choices for NCDs through a focus on safe, affordable, and effective forms of transportation. There are opportunities to improve decision-making for health by involving more available data for health, building on existing infrastructures, building stronger political leadership and commitments, and establishing formal frameworks to improve multisectoral collaborations within megacities. Future research will benefit from addressing the political and bureaucratic processes of using health data when designing public transportation services, the political and social obstacles involved, and the cross-national lessons that can be learned from other megacities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304155
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.671
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.211
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBabajide, O-
dc.contributor.authorMartins, DC-
dc.contributor.authorMaani, N-
dc.contributor.authorAbdalla, SM-
dc.contributor.authorGómez, EJ-
dc.contributor.authorPongsiri, MJ-
dc.contributor.authorTlou, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GM-
dc.contributor.authorBenjamin, GC-
dc.contributor.authorGoosby, E-
dc.contributor.authorDain, K-
dc.contributor.authorVega, J-
dc.contributor.authorZeinali, Z-
dc.contributor.authorGalea, S-
dc.contributor.authorSturchio, J-
dc.contributor.authorTwum-Danso, NAY-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T08:55:59Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-23T08:55:59Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Urban Health, 2021, v. 98 n. suppl. 1, p. 60-68-
dc.identifier.issn1099-3460-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304155-
dc.description.abstractNoncommunicable diseases (NCDs) represent a significant global public health burden. As more countries experience both epidemiologic transition and increasing urbanization, it is clear that we need approaches to mitigate the growing burden of NCDs. Large and growing urban environments play an important role in shaping risk factors that influence NCDs, pointing to the ineluctable need to engage sectors beyond the health sector in these settings if we are to improve health. By way of one example, the transportation sector plays a critical role in building and sustaining health outcomes in urban environments in general and in megacities in particular. We conducted a qualitative comparative case study design. We compared Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) policies in 3 megacities—Lagos (Africa), Bogotá (South America), and Beijing (Asia). We examined the extent to which data on the social determinants of health, equity considerations, and multisectoral approaches were incorporated into local politics and the decision-making processes surrounding BRT. We found that all three megacities paid inadequate attention to health in their agenda-setting, despite having considerable healthy transportation policies in principle. BRT system policies have the opportunity to improve lifestyle choices for NCDs through a focus on safe, affordable, and effective forms of transportation. There are opportunities to improve decision-making for health by involving more available data for health, building on existing infrastructures, building stronger political leadership and commitments, and establishing formal frameworks to improve multisectoral collaborations within megacities. Future research will benefit from addressing the political and bureaucratic processes of using health data when designing public transportation services, the political and social obstacles involved, and the cross-national lessons that can be learned from other megacities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.springer.com/journal/11524-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Urban Health-
dc.subjectBRT-
dc.subjectHiAP-
dc.subjectHealth-in-all-policies-
dc.subjectHealth policy-
dc.subjectTransportation sector-
dc.subjectMegacities-
dc.subjectSocial determinants of health-
dc.subjectSDoH-
dc.titleImproving decision-making for population health in nonhealth sectors in urban environments: the example of the transportation sector in three megacities—the 3-D commission-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11524-021-00561-y-
dc.identifier.pmid34435262-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8440744-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85113360268-
dc.identifier.hkuros325233-
dc.identifier.volume98-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage60-
dc.identifier.epage68-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000688402100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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