File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Socioeconomic determinants of depression amid the anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong: the mediating role of daily routine disruptions

TitleSocioeconomic determinants of depression amid the anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong: the mediating role of daily routine disruptions
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2020, v. 74 n. 12, p. 988-994 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Previous research has suggested a socioeconomic gradient of mental health in the face of potentially traumatic events. Nevertheless, few studies examined the intermediary mechanisms of this gradient. This study tested a hypothesised mediating effect of disruptions to daily routines (eg, eating/sleeping habits) between socioeconomic status (SES) and depression among participants and non-participants of the anti-extradition bill protests in summer 2019 in Hong Kong. Methods: A territory-wide telephone survey was conducted during the movement in the first 3 weeks of July 2019 to collect self-report data from 1112 Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong citizens. Stratified by participation in the anti-extradition bill protests, logistic regression was conducted to examine the inverse relationship between SES and depression. Subsequently, path analysis was conducted to test the hypothesised indirect effect through daily routine disruptions. Results: In total, 581 (52.2%) respondents participated in the anti-extradition bill protests. Logistic regression showed that higher educational attainment was protective of depression among both participants and non-participants, while the protective effect of household income level HK$40 000–HK$79 999 (compared with
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/297153
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.342
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, FTT-
dc.contributor.authorHall, BJ-
dc.contributor.authorLiang, L-
dc.contributor.authorGalea, S-
dc.contributor.authorHou, WK-
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-08T07:14:55Z-
dc.date.available2021-03-08T07:14:55Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2020, v. 74 n. 12, p. 988-994-
dc.identifier.issn0143-005X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/297153-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Previous research has suggested a socioeconomic gradient of mental health in the face of potentially traumatic events. Nevertheless, few studies examined the intermediary mechanisms of this gradient. This study tested a hypothesised mediating effect of disruptions to daily routines (eg, eating/sleeping habits) between socioeconomic status (SES) and depression among participants and non-participants of the anti-extradition bill protests in summer 2019 in Hong Kong. Methods: A territory-wide telephone survey was conducted during the movement in the first 3 weeks of July 2019 to collect self-report data from 1112 Cantonese-speaking Hong Kong citizens. Stratified by participation in the anti-extradition bill protests, logistic regression was conducted to examine the inverse relationship between SES and depression. Subsequently, path analysis was conducted to test the hypothesised indirect effect through daily routine disruptions. Results: In total, 581 (52.2%) respondents participated in the anti-extradition bill protests. Logistic regression showed that higher educational attainment was protective of depression among both participants and non-participants, while the protective effect of household income level HK$40 000–HK$79 999 (compared with <HK$20 000) was only observed among participants. Path analysis showed that 50.3% of the socioeconomic gradient was explained by daily routine disruptions among participants, compared with 8.3% among non-participants. Conclusions: Daily routine disruptions partially explain the association between low SES and depression, especially among participants of the anti-extradition bill protests. To improve population mental health, such disruptions should be mitigated.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health-
dc.rightsJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health. Copyright © BMJ Publishing Group.-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 2020 following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jech-2019-213693 © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. Published by BMJ. 2020-
dc.titleSocioeconomic determinants of depression amid the anti-extradition bill protests in Hong Kong: the mediating role of daily routine disruptions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLai, FTT: fttlai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLai, FTT=rp02802-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jech-2019-213693-
dc.identifier.pmid32788304-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85092492186-
dc.identifier.hkuros321657-
dc.identifier.volume74-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage988-
dc.identifier.epage994-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000620130800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0143-005X-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats