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Article: When to Approach and When to Avoid? Functional Flexibility Is the Key

TitleWhen to Approach and When to Avoid? Functional Flexibility Is the Key
Authors
KeywordsDual Process Theory
Coping Behavior
Flexibility
Issue Date2019
PublisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1047840X.asp
Citation
Psychological Inquiry, 2019, v. 30, p. 125-129 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the target article, Scholer, Cornwell, and Higgins (this issue) put forward a dynamic, nuanced approach to the study of motivation. In explicating the complexities of motivation and strategies derived therefrom, they formulate a self-regulatory hierarchy based on an extensive literature review and the collation of empirical evidence. Their article is brimful of insights into the motivation literature, particularly the widely held belief about the adaptiveness of approach (vs. avoidance) motivation. In their view, no single type of motivation-driven strategy is inherently adaptive or maladaptive. Rather, adaptiveness depends largely on whether the implemented strategy is aligned with one’s goals and the specific demands of the situation in which implementation takes place. Such alignment plays a pivotal role in determining strategy effectiveness, and in our opinion this issue constitutes the “meat” of their work. However, the target article focuses primarily on delineating the authors’ proposed self-regulatory hierarchy, with insufficient coverage devoted to stipulating the circumstances in which the aforementioned alignment is attained. Our aim in this commentary is to expand their work by digging into this important but unexplored issue in an endeavor to identify the elements that are crucial to effective strategy implementation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289615
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 9.917
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.166

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, C-
dc.contributor.authorCHAU, CL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:15:05Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:15:05Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Inquiry, 2019, v. 30, p. 125-129-
dc.identifier.issn1047-840X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289615-
dc.description.abstractIn the target article, Scholer, Cornwell, and Higgins (this issue) put forward a dynamic, nuanced approach to the study of motivation. In explicating the complexities of motivation and strategies derived therefrom, they formulate a self-regulatory hierarchy based on an extensive literature review and the collation of empirical evidence. Their article is brimful of insights into the motivation literature, particularly the widely held belief about the adaptiveness of approach (vs. avoidance) motivation. In their view, no single type of motivation-driven strategy is inherently adaptive or maladaptive. Rather, adaptiveness depends largely on whether the implemented strategy is aligned with one’s goals and the specific demands of the situation in which implementation takes place. Such alignment plays a pivotal role in determining strategy effectiveness, and in our opinion this issue constitutes the “meat” of their work. However, the target article focuses primarily on delineating the authors’ proposed self-regulatory hierarchy, with insufficient coverage devoted to stipulating the circumstances in which the aforementioned alignment is attained. Our aim in this commentary is to expand their work by digging into this important but unexplored issue in an endeavor to identify the elements that are crucial to effective strategy implementation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPsychology Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/1047840X.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Inquiry-
dc.rightsPsychological Inquiry. Copyright © Psychology Press.-
dc.rightsPREPRINT This is a preprint of an article whose final and definitive form has been published in the [JOURNAL TITLE] [year of publication] [copyright Taylor & Francis]; [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article POSTPRINT ‘This is an electronic version of an article published in [include the complete citation information for the final version of the article as published in the print edition of the journal]. [JOURNAL TITLE] is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/ with the open URL of your article.-
dc.subjectDual Process Theory-
dc.subjectCoping Behavior-
dc.subjectFlexibility-
dc.titleWhen to Approach and When to Avoid? Functional Flexibility Is the Key-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, C: ceccheng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, C=rp00588-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1047840X.2019.1646040-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85073261126-
dc.identifier.hkuros317319-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.spage125-
dc.identifier.epage129-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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