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Article: In-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes among patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in Wuhan, China

TitleIn-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes among patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in Wuhan, China
Authors
KeywordsIn-hospital cardiac arrest
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
COVID-19
ROSC
Survival
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitation
Citation
Resuscitation, 2020, v. 151, p. 18-23 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in Wuhan, China. Methods: The outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia after IHCA over a 40-day period were retrospectively evaluated. Between January 15 and February 25, 2020, data for all cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts for IHCA that occurred in a tertiary teaching hospital in Wuhan, China were collected according to the Utstein style. The primary outcome was restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the secondary outcomes were 30-day survival, and neurological outcome. Results: Data from 136 patients showed 119 (87.5%) patients had a respiratory cause for their cardiac arrest, and 113 (83.1%) were resuscitated in a general ward. The initial rhythm was asystole in 89.7%, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in 4.4%, and shockable in 5.9%. Most patients with IHCA were monitored (93.4%) and in most resuscitation (89%) was initiated <1 min. The average length of hospital stay was 7 days and the time from illness onset to hospital admission was 10 days. The most frequent comorbidity was hypertension (30.2%), and the most frequent symptom was shortness of breath (75%). Of the patients receiving CPR, ROSC was achieved in 18 (13.2%) patients, 4 (2.9%) patients survived for at least 30 days, and one patient achieved a favourable neurological outcome at 30 days. Cardiac arrest location and initial rhythm were associated with better outcomes. Conclusion: Survival of patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia who had an in-hospital cardiac arrest was poor in Wuhan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287619
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.215
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.231
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShao, F-
dc.contributor.authorXu, S-
dc.contributor.authorMa, X-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLyu, J-
dc.contributor.authorNg, M-
dc.contributor.authorCui, H-
dc.contributor.authorYu, C-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorSun, P-
dc.contributor.authorTang, Z-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:00:45Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:00:45Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationResuscitation, 2020, v. 151, p. 18-23-
dc.identifier.issn0300-9572-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287619-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 and in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) in Wuhan, China. Methods: The outcomes of patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia after IHCA over a 40-day period were retrospectively evaluated. Between January 15 and February 25, 2020, data for all cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) attempts for IHCA that occurred in a tertiary teaching hospital in Wuhan, China were collected according to the Utstein style. The primary outcome was restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the secondary outcomes were 30-day survival, and neurological outcome. Results: Data from 136 patients showed 119 (87.5%) patients had a respiratory cause for their cardiac arrest, and 113 (83.1%) were resuscitated in a general ward. The initial rhythm was asystole in 89.7%, pulseless electrical activity (PEA) in 4.4%, and shockable in 5.9%. Most patients with IHCA were monitored (93.4%) and in most resuscitation (89%) was initiated <1 min. The average length of hospital stay was 7 days and the time from illness onset to hospital admission was 10 days. The most frequent comorbidity was hypertension (30.2%), and the most frequent symptom was shortness of breath (75%). Of the patients receiving CPR, ROSC was achieved in 18 (13.2%) patients, 4 (2.9%) patients survived for at least 30 days, and one patient achieved a favourable neurological outcome at 30 days. Cardiac arrest location and initial rhythm were associated with better outcomes. Conclusion: Survival of patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia who had an in-hospital cardiac arrest was poor in Wuhan. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/resuscitation-
dc.relation.ispartofResuscitation-
dc.subjectIn-hospital cardiac arrest-
dc.subjectCardiopulmonary resuscitation-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectROSC-
dc.subjectSurvival-
dc.titleIn-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes among patients with COVID-19 pneumonia in Wuhan, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, M: michael.ng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, M=rp02578-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.resuscitation.2020.04.005-
dc.identifier.pmid32283117-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7151543-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083360548-
dc.identifier.hkuros315742-
dc.identifier.volume151-
dc.identifier.spage18-
dc.identifier.epage23-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000547372900022-
dc.publisher.placeIreland-
dc.identifier.issnl0300-9572-

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