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Article: Repentance in Chinese Buddhism: Implications for mental health professionals

TitleRepentance in Chinese Buddhism: Implications for mental health professionals
Authors
KeywordsRepentance
Buddhist counseling
spirituality in counseling
Buddhism-derived treatments
Chinese Buddhism
Issue Date2017
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wspi20#.VPTMAPldX5E
Citation
Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 2017, v. 19 n. 3, p. 210-216 How to Cite?
AbstractRepentance in Chinese Buddhism is a common practice for monastics and lay practitioners to repent for transgressions and commit to corrective actions guided by Buddhism. Regardless of the significance and prevalence of repentance, little is known about its psychological effects and implications for counseling. In response to the American Psychological Association’s guidelines to respect clients’ cultural practices, this article addresses the research gap by elucidating the practices and implications of repentance, the psychological significance, and implications for mental health professionals to consider and apply repentance in counseling. A hypothetical case example was used to illustrate the pragmatic application of repentance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284952
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.220

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, KCG-
dc.contributor.authorOh, A-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Q-
dc.contributor.authorWu, FY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, S-
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, T-
dc.contributor.authorOng, CK-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:04:47Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:04:47Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 2017, v. 19 n. 3, p. 210-216-
dc.identifier.issn1934-9637-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284952-
dc.description.abstractRepentance in Chinese Buddhism is a common practice for monastics and lay practitioners to repent for transgressions and commit to corrective actions guided by Buddhism. Regardless of the significance and prevalence of repentance, little is known about its psychological effects and implications for counseling. In response to the American Psychological Association’s guidelines to respect clients’ cultural practices, this article addresses the research gap by elucidating the practices and implications of repentance, the psychological significance, and implications for mental health professionals to consider and apply repentance in counseling. A hypothetical case example was used to illustrate the pragmatic application of repentance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wspi20#.VPTMAPldX5E-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Spirituality in Mental Health-
dc.rightsPostprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health] on [2017], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19349637.2016.1204258-
dc.subjectRepentance-
dc.subjectBuddhist counseling-
dc.subjectspirituality in counseling-
dc.subjectBuddhism-derived treatments-
dc.subjectChinese Buddhism-
dc.titleRepentance in Chinese Buddhism: Implications for mental health professionals-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, KCG: leekincheung123@gmail.com-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19349637.2016.1204258-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84978525667-
dc.identifier.hkuros312111-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage210-
dc.identifier.epage216-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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