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Article: Occurrence and trophic magnification profile of triphenyltin compounds in marine mammals and their corresponding food webs

TitleOccurrence and trophic magnification profile of triphenyltin compounds in marine mammals and their corresponding food webs
Authors
KeywordsMarine mammal
Food web
Biomagnification
Organotin compounds
Stable Isotope
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier: Creative Commons Licenses. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envint
Citation
Environment International, 2020, v. 137, p. article no. 105567 How to Cite?
AbstractThe occurrence of triphenyltin (TPT) compounds, a highly toxic antifouling biocide, has been documented in marine environments and organisms all over the world. While some studies showed that marine mammals can be used as sentinel organisms to evaluate the pollution status of emerging contaminants in the environment because of their long lifespans and high trophic levels, information regarding the contamination status of TPT in marine mammal species has been limited over the past decade. More importantly, the primary bioaccumulation pathway of TPT in these long-lived apex predators and the corresponding marine food web is still uncertain. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the contamination statuses of TPT in two marine mammal species, namely the finless porpoise and the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, and assess the trophic magnification potential of TPT along the food webs of these two species, using stable isotope analysis, and chemical analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that TPT is the predominant residue in majority of the analyzed individuals of two marine mammals, with concentrations ranging from 426.2 to 3476.6 ng/g wet weight in their muscle tissues. Our results also demonstrated an exponential increase in the concentration of TPT along the marine food web, indicating that trophic magnification occurs in the respective food webs of the two marine mammals. The range of trophic magnification factors of TPT in the food webs of finless porpoise and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin was 2.51–3.47 and 2.45–3.39, respectively. These results suggest that high trophic organisms may be more vulnerable to the exposure of TPT-contaminated environments due to the high trophic magnification potential, and thus ecological risk of these compounds ought to be assessed with the consideration of their bioaccumulation potentials in these marine mammals.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284704
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 7.577
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.684

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSHAM, RCT-
dc.contributor.authorTao, LSR-
dc.contributor.authorMak, YKY-
dc.contributor.authorYAU, JKC-
dc.contributor.authorWai, TC-
dc.contributor.authorHo, KY-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, GJ-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWang, X-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:01:32Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:01:32Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment International, 2020, v. 137, p. article no. 105567-
dc.identifier.issn0160-4120-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284704-
dc.description.abstractThe occurrence of triphenyltin (TPT) compounds, a highly toxic antifouling biocide, has been documented in marine environments and organisms all over the world. While some studies showed that marine mammals can be used as sentinel organisms to evaluate the pollution status of emerging contaminants in the environment because of their long lifespans and high trophic levels, information regarding the contamination status of TPT in marine mammal species has been limited over the past decade. More importantly, the primary bioaccumulation pathway of TPT in these long-lived apex predators and the corresponding marine food web is still uncertain. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the contamination statuses of TPT in two marine mammal species, namely the finless porpoise and the Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin, and assess the trophic magnification potential of TPT along the food webs of these two species, using stable isotope analysis, and chemical analysis with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results showed that TPT is the predominant residue in majority of the analyzed individuals of two marine mammals, with concentrations ranging from 426.2 to 3476.6 ng/g wet weight in their muscle tissues. Our results also demonstrated an exponential increase in the concentration of TPT along the marine food web, indicating that trophic magnification occurs in the respective food webs of the two marine mammals. The range of trophic magnification factors of TPT in the food webs of finless porpoise and Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin was 2.51–3.47 and 2.45–3.39, respectively. These results suggest that high trophic organisms may be more vulnerable to the exposure of TPT-contaminated environments due to the high trophic magnification potential, and thus ecological risk of these compounds ought to be assessed with the consideration of their bioaccumulation potentials in these marine mammals.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier: Creative Commons Licenses. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envint-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment International-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectMarine mammal-
dc.subjectFood web-
dc.subjectBiomagnification-
dc.subjectOrganotin compounds-
dc.subjectStable Isotope-
dc.titleOccurrence and trophic magnification profile of triphenyltin compounds in marine mammals and their corresponding food webs-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTao, LSR: taoshiru@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMak, YKY: yannymak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhou, GJ: zhougj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envint.2020.105567-
dc.identifier.pmid32087482-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85079615782-
dc.identifier.hkuros311983-
dc.identifier.volume137-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 105567-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 105567-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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