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Article: First Isolation and Rapid Identification of Newcastle Disease Virus from Aborted Fetus of Dromedary Camel Using Next-Generation Sequencing

TitleFirst Isolation and Rapid Identification of Newcastle Disease Virus from Aborted Fetus of Dromedary Camel Using Next-Generation Sequencing
Authors
KeywordsNewcastle Disease virus
aborted fetus
dromedary
Issue Date2019
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI) AG.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/viruses
Citation
Viruses, 2019, v. 11 n. 9, p. article no. 810 How to Cite?
AbstractNewcastle disease virus (NDV) causes morbidities and mortalities in wild and domestic birds globally. For humans, exposure to infected birds can cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like symptoms. NDV infections in mammals are rarely reported. In this study, using next-generation sequencing, an NDV was identified and isolated from Vero cells inoculated with the nasal swab of an aborted dromedary fetus in Dubai, during the time when an NDV outbreak occurred in a pigeon farm located in close proximity to the dairy camel farm where the mother of the aborted dromedary fetus resided, and there were a lot of pigeons in the camel farm. Genome analysis revealed that the structurally and functionally important features of other NDVs were also present in this dromedary NDV genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of fusion protein (F), hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein (HN) and complete polyprotein showed that the virus belonged to sub-genotype VIg of class II NDV and is most closely related to pigeon NDVs in Egypt in the same year. The present study is the first that demonstrated isolation of NDV in dromedaries. Further study is warranted to investigate the relationship between NDV infection and abortion.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281882
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 3.811
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.873
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTeng, JLL-
dc.contributor.authorWernery, U-
dc.contributor.authorLee, HH-
dc.contributor.authorJoseph, S-
dc.contributor.authorFung, J-
dc.contributor.authorElizabeth, SK-
dc.contributor.authorYeong, KY-
dc.contributor.authorKinne, J-
dc.contributor.authorChan, K-H-
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKP-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-03T07:23:07Z-
dc.date.available2020-04-03T07:23:07Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationViruses, 2019, v. 11 n. 9, p. article no. 810-
dc.identifier.issn1999-4915-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281882-
dc.description.abstractNewcastle disease virus (NDV) causes morbidities and mortalities in wild and domestic birds globally. For humans, exposure to infected birds can cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like symptoms. NDV infections in mammals are rarely reported. In this study, using next-generation sequencing, an NDV was identified and isolated from Vero cells inoculated with the nasal swab of an aborted dromedary fetus in Dubai, during the time when an NDV outbreak occurred in a pigeon farm located in close proximity to the dairy camel farm where the mother of the aborted dromedary fetus resided, and there were a lot of pigeons in the camel farm. Genome analysis revealed that the structurally and functionally important features of other NDVs were also present in this dromedary NDV genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of fusion protein (F), hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein (HN) and complete polyprotein showed that the virus belonged to sub-genotype VIg of class II NDV and is most closely related to pigeon NDVs in Egypt in the same year. The present study is the first that demonstrated isolation of NDV in dromedaries. Further study is warranted to investigate the relationship between NDV infection and abortion.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI) AG.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/viruses-
dc.relation.ispartofViruses-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectNewcastle Disease virus-
dc.subjectaborted fetus-
dc.subjectdromedary-
dc.titleFirst Isolation and Rapid Identification of Newcastle Disease Virus from Aborted Fetus of Dromedary Camel Using Next-Generation Sequencing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTeng, JLL: llteng@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, K-H: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTeng, JLL=rp00277-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, K-H=rp01921-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486-
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/v11090810-
dc.identifier.pmid31480604-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6783818-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85071749249-
dc.identifier.hkuros309632-
dc.identifier.volume11-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 810-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 810-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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