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Article: Outdoor, indoor, and personal black carbon exposure from cookstoves burning solid fuels

TitleOutdoor, indoor, and personal black carbon exposure from cookstoves burning solid fuels
Authors
KeywordsBlack carbon
China
Climate change
Coal
Household air pollution
Issue Date2016
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA
Citation
Indoor Air, 2016, v. 26 n. 5, p. 784-795 How to Cite?
AbstractBlack carbon (BC) emissions from solid fuel combustion are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and are important drivers of climate change. We studied BC measurements, approximated by particulate matter (PM2.5 ) absorbance, in rural Yunnan province, China, whose residents use a variety of solid fuels for cooking and heating including bituminous and anthracite coal, and wood. Measurements were taken over two consecutive 24-h periods from 163 households in 30 villages. PM2.5 absorbance (PMabs ) was measured using an EEL 043 Smoke Stain Reflectometer. PMabs measurements were higher in wood burning households (16.3 × 10(-5) /m) than bituminous and anthracite coal households (12 and 5.1 × 10(-5) /m, respectively). Among bituminous coal users, measurements varied by a factor of two depending on the coal source. Portable stoves (which are lit outdoors and brought indoors for use) were associated with reduced PMabs levels, but no other impact of stove design was observed. Outdoor measurements were positively correlated with and approximately half the level of indoor measurements (r = 0.49, P < 0.01). Measurements of BC (as approximated by PMabs ) in this population are modulated by fuel type and source. This provides valuable insight into potential morbidity, mortality, and climate change contributions of domestic usage of solid fuels.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281192
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.739
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.666
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDownward, GS-
dc.contributor.authorHu, W-
dc.contributor.authorRothman, N-
dc.contributor.authorReiss, B-
dc.contributor.authorWu, G-
dc.contributor.authorWei , F-
dc.contributor.authorXu, J-
dc.contributor.authorSeow, WJ-
dc.contributor.authorBrunekreef, B-
dc.contributor.authorChapman, RS-
dc.contributor.authorQing , L-
dc.contributor.authorVermeulen, R-
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-09T09:51:23Z-
dc.date.available2020-03-09T09:51:23Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationIndoor Air, 2016, v. 26 n. 5, p. 784-795-
dc.identifier.issn0905-6947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/281192-
dc.description.abstractBlack carbon (BC) emissions from solid fuel combustion are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and are important drivers of climate change. We studied BC measurements, approximated by particulate matter (PM2.5 ) absorbance, in rural Yunnan province, China, whose residents use a variety of solid fuels for cooking and heating including bituminous and anthracite coal, and wood. Measurements were taken over two consecutive 24-h periods from 163 households in 30 villages. PM2.5 absorbance (PMabs ) was measured using an EEL 043 Smoke Stain Reflectometer. PMabs measurements were higher in wood burning households (16.3 × 10(-5) /m) than bituminous and anthracite coal households (12 and 5.1 × 10(-5) /m, respectively). Among bituminous coal users, measurements varied by a factor of two depending on the coal source. Portable stoves (which are lit outdoors and brought indoors for use) were associated with reduced PMabs levels, but no other impact of stove design was observed. Outdoor measurements were positively correlated with and approximately half the level of indoor measurements (r = 0.49, P < 0.01). Measurements of BC (as approximated by PMabs ) in this population are modulated by fuel type and source. This provides valuable insight into potential morbidity, mortality, and climate change contributions of domestic usage of solid fuels.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/INA-
dc.relation.ispartofIndoor Air-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectBlack carbon-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectCoal-
dc.subjectHousehold air pollution-
dc.titleOutdoor, indoor, and personal black carbon exposure from cookstoves burning solid fuels-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXu, J: xusunjun@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/ina.12255-
dc.identifier.pmid26452237-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4826638-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85028268530-
dc.identifier.hkuros309325-
dc.identifier.volume26-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage784-
dc.identifier.epage795-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-

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